Cromer mayor puts ambulance service under microscope

Tim Adams and John Frosdick, the mayor and deputy mayor of Cromer, are pictured during their visit t

Tim Adams and John Frosdick, the mayor and deputy mayor of Cromer, are pictured during their visit to the town's ambulance station. Picture: DAVE 'HUBBA' ROBERTS - Credit: DAVE 'HUBBA' ROBERTS

Ambulance staff in north Norfolk have been praised by local officials following a recent visit.

Tim Adams and John Frosdick, the mayor and deputy mayor of Cromer, dropped by the ambulance station in Middlebrook Way to get an update on the work of the East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EEAST) in the area.

They met with duty locality officer Dale Meacham-Roberts and paramedic Paul McReynolds and discussed plans for overnight coverage of the station's rapid response vehicle and an early intervention falls vehicle.

Councillor Adams said: 'We learn something new every time we meet with staff.

'We were absolutely delighted to be given such an opportunity to learn first-hand what is happening and we treasure our links to the ambulance service, which really does undertake some of the most important work in our community.


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'Our town council looks forward to continuing its good working relationship with EEAST in north Norfolk and we welcome the potential increase to capacity to the local service. We were also pleased that ambulance Trust User Group volunteer David Russell was able to join us.'

The visit followed reports last month of a worrying gulf in ambulance response times across the region, with figures revealing that patients in rural areas were waiting up to 12 minutes longer for an emergency ambulance than people in towns.

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Mr Meacham-Roberts said: 'It is always a pleasure to receive a visit from our councillors and to update them on new projects and the challenges we face.

'Our staff really appreciate the councillors' continued support and interest in the work they do.'

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