Cromer could be set for return to swinging ‘60s

Students on Cromer seafront in the 1960s. Picture: POPPYLAND PUBLISHING

Students on Cromer seafront in the 1960s. Picture: POPPYLAND PUBLISHING - Credit: Archant

One was the era of evacuees, ration books and GI brides the other a time of teenage rebellion, 'peace and love' and Beatlemania.

Cilla Black perfoming at the Olympia, Cromer, backed by Sounds Incorporated on April 12 1964.

Cilla Black perfoming at the Olympia, Cromer, backed by Sounds Incorporated on April 12 1964.

With Sheringham staging a popular salute to the 1940s, a move is underway for neighbouring Cromer to host a nostalgic tribute to the swinging '60s.

Suggestions include performances by 1960s bands, tribute acts and period re-enactments. The idea has been discussed by town councillors after it was taken up on social media.

The meeting also looked at whether Cromer could join forces with Sheringham and Holt to celebrate the 1940s weekend.

Cromer Mayor Tim Adams said: 'Quite a lot of people have come up with the idea of a '60s weekend and there has been plenty of discussion on social media. There is a bit of energy behind that proposal both from people living in the town and visitors.'


You may also want to watch:


He added: 'It is not an era I lived through, but grew up listening to my mum's old vinyl collection and became a fan of the Rolling Stones, Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin.'

While London had Carnaby Street and Liverpool the Cavern Club the places to be seen in Cromer during the decade included Olympia and Royal Links Pavilion.

Most Read

The Olympia roller skating rink became a popular music venue staging performances by Cilla Black and Billy J Kramer. Later converted to a warehouse for herbs and spices, the building was demolished in the 1980s to make way for a supermarket car park.

The Royal Links Pavilion also held gigs by some of the decade's biggest bands including The Who and Tremeloes. It was the scene of a concert by legendary punk rockers The Sex Pistols on Christmas Eve 1977 and burnt down the following year.

Poppyland Publishing owner Peter Stibbons, spent his formative years in the town during the 1960s.

Mr Stibbons said: 'The biggest difference between Cromer then and now was there were more things for youngsters to do. There was an active youth club, two or three coffee bars and lots of young people living in the town centre, where now there tends to be more holiday homes.'

He added: 'Plenty of people like vintage fairs and I think there would be a lot of interest in dressing up in period clothes.'

Cromer and District Chamber of Trade and Commerce president Gary Dickenson was invited to judge the best shop window display at last month's 1940s weekend.

He said: 'The idea of a mixed century event could work. In terms of business it is easy to dress the windows with stuff from the war, like sandbags, bombs and tape. I am not quite sure how that would happen with the '60s.'

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter