Council tax rise of 4.9pc mooted by Norfolk County Council would add £1.17 a week on Band D home bill

Norfolk County Council is planning for a 4.9pc council tax increase. Picture: Denise Bradley

Norfolk County Council is planning for a 4.9pc council tax increase. Picture: Denise Bradley - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2012

People in Norfolk could be asked to pay an extra £1.17 a week to County Hall from next year - as the council wrestles with ways to save £100m by 2022.

Norfolk County Council is planning its budget for next year on the assumption there will be a 4.9pc increase in its share of the council tax - which would be the biggest rise since 2006.

That figure includes 3pc specifically to pay for adult social care - the same increase as was levied on the county's taxpayers as part of this year's 4.8pc hike.

If the 4.9pc increase is agreed when the full council meets in February next year, the average Band D property would pay £1,309.09 to County Hall in 2018/19 - £61.14 more than this year.

Norfolk County Council needs to save £100m over the next four years, on top of £25m of cuts and savings already in train.

Cliff Jordan, leader of Norfolk County Council. Pic: Norfolk Conservatives.

Cliff Jordan, leader of Norfolk County Council. Pic: Norfolk Conservatives. - Credit: Norfolk Conservatives


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Council leaders say, without the tax rise, even more savings would be needed.

Saving targets include £31m from adult social care, £23.5m from children's services and £31.2m from community and environmental services.

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Reports outlining the potential savings will come before each of the council's committees starting from next week. The agenda for the adult social care committee has been published and outlines some £12.1m of new savings.

That includes saving £6m by 2022 by 'making the most of new digital innovations'.

It also proposes saving £400,000 in the next year by changing its charging policy for disabled people, which could mean some have to contribute more to the costs of their care.

And £1.5m could be saved between 2019/20 and 2021/22 by making more use of assistive technology, to help people stay independent and reduce the need for formal care and support.

Another proposal is to save more than £680,000 in 2018/19 by better targeting respite for carers - which the council says would reduce or delay need for formal care, such as residential care.

Cliff Jordan, leader of the Conservative-controlled council, said there had been under investment in the past.

He said: 'What I am trying to do is get things set up so that, in the future, we don't have to keep putting council tax up.'

Council tax bills are split between the county council, police, district, borough or city councils and, in some areas, town and parish councils.

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