Food waste collections extended to 1,700 extra homes

More homes in Broadland will soon be able to recycle leftover food. Pic: Getty Images/Stockphoto.

More homes in Broadland will soon be able to recycle leftover food. Pic: Getty Images/Stockphoto. - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

An extra 1,700 households in Norfolk will be able to get their food waste collected from next month.

Food caddies will soon be delivered to homes in Thorpe St Andrew, Sprowston, Old Catton, Spixworth and Drayton, where people will start receiving food waste collections from April 26.

Broadland District Council, which was the first council in Norfolk to carry out separate food waste collections in 2008, is expanding its service.

What started as a six-month, government-funded trial serving about 6,000 homes is now offered to more than 30,000 homes - almost half of all households in the district.

New food waste caddies are due to be delivered in the week starting April 19.

Households will receive a small caddy for use inside the house and a larger one to be left out for collection, as well as liners.

Two weeks prior to the caddies being delivered, a leaflet explaining the food recycling process will be delivered.

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The food waste expansion comes as Broadland District Council pledges its support for Food Waste Action Week 2021.

Broadland councillor Judy Leggett. Picture: Broadland District Council

Broadland councillor Judy Leggett. Picture: Broadland District Council - Credit: Archant

Judy Leggett, portfolio holder for environmental excellence, said: “We are committed to preventing food waste both through our own operations and through supporting our residents to reduce food waste at home, and we are proud signatories of the Courtauld Commitment. 

“We pledge our support for Food Waste Action Week 2021 as we believe that working together with WRAP to share vital messages about wasting food is the best way to emphasise the importance of preventing food waste and reducing the harm to the environment. 

“Our food is as precious as our planet, and as a supporter we have a fantastic opportunity to inspire our residents to make essential changes that can reduce wasted food and ultimately help protect the planet we all share.”

More than £2m has been added to Norfolk's bill for dealing with waste and recycling during the coronavirus pandemic - partly due to people doing more shopping online.

People spending more time at home due to Covid-19 lockdowns contributed to 14,000 tonnes of extra rubbish and 11,000 tonnes more recycling being produced.

Some councils have bought and provided extra bins to cope with the increase in rubbish and recycling.

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