Live ammunition from 1943 found in elderly resident’s loft

The ammunition, which was found in the loft of an elderly person, included a clip of five .303 round

The ammunition, which was found in the loft of an elderly person, included a clip of five .303 rounds. Photo: Broadland Police - Credit: Archant

Live ammunition thought to be from the Second World War has been found in the loft of a Norfolk home.

The unfired .50 calibre rounds were found by members of an aviation heritage group on Tuesday, under

The unfired .50 calibre rounds were found by members of an aviation heritage group on Tuesday, underneath a section of armour plating from a gun turret. Photo: New Farm Aviation Heritage Group. - Credit: Archant

The clip of five .303 rounds and another larger round were handed to police in Aylsham on Monday morning (November 5).

PC Rob Devlin said a man brought them to the station after finding them in an elderly relative's loft.

He said it appeared as though the ammunition had been kept as a memento as the larger round, thought to be a .50 calibre, was dated 1943.

PC Devlin said: 'I would much rather someone come to us with munitions as opposed to disposing it any other way.


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'We don't want people to put stuff like that in the bin or dump them as scrap metal thinking they are not necessarily live.'

In a Twitter post, Broadland Police said the rounds were 'potentially lethal'.

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PC Devlin said the rounds will be locked away and labelled before being sent for disposal.

It is not the first time ammunition has been found in Norfolk.

Last year, members of an aviation heritage group discovered more than 1,000 armour-piercing machine gun rounds buried in a field in Rackheath.

The unfired .50 calibre ammunition was found underneath a section of armour plating from a gun turret.

It is believed it could have been buried more than 70 years ago during the Second World War.

The ammunition was used in the turrets of American B-24 Liberator bombers, which flew from the former RAF Rackheath airbase.

Around 1,500 rounds - including tracer and fire-starting incendiary rounds - were discovered three feet underground.

They were taken away later in the evening by the army bomb disposal unit from Colchester.

Speaking back in September, the chairman of the New Farm Aviation Heritage Museum in Frettenham, who did not wish to be named, said some of the rounds were still attached to the original ammunition belts.

He said they had different coloured tips, which indicated whether the bullet was armour piercing or a tracer.

'I think someone must have just buried them rather than taking them home [to America],' he said. 'Because you can imagine the weight if it all had to be taken back on an aircraft.'

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