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Teenager appears on national TV to talk about struggle of planning for future as young carer

PUBLISHED: 12:07 20 February 2020 | UPDATED: 12:07 20 February 2020

Lynne Haverson, from King’s Lynn, took part in a live discussion on the Victoria Derbyshire Show. Picture: Lynne Haverson.

Lynne Haverson, from King’s Lynn, took part in a live discussion on the Victoria Derbyshire Show. Picture: Lynne Haverson.

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A Norfolk teenager has shared the struggles of considering her future as she acts as a carer for her young disabled sister.

Lynne Haverson, from King�s Lynn, took part in a live discussion on the Victoria Derbyshire Show. Picture: Lynne Haverson.Lynne Haverson, from King�s Lynn, took part in a live discussion on the Victoria Derbyshire Show. Picture: Lynne Haverson.

Lynne Haverson, from King's Lynn, took part in a live discussion on the Victoria Derbyshire Show on BBC TV.

Miss Haverson, 17, helps her parents to look after her 13-year-old sister Francesca, who has epilepsy, global development delay, alcohol fetal syndrome and ADHD.

Miss Haverson, who won Young Carer of the year for Cambridge and Norfolk last year, said her main roles were washing, cooking and sometimes administering medication when her mum was not able to.

The teenager said it was hard to think of a future not looking after her sister even with dreams of going to university.

Speaking on the programme, Miss Haverson, who has ADHD herself, said: "I've talked to my mum about it and we try and figure things out and she tells me that I am not always going to have to look after her but I feel that is what's going to happen.

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"I feel my future is going to be with her not by myself doing what I want."

She said every day could be 'stressful' as her sister could become aggressive.

Miss Haverson said: "She can put up a fight if she doesn't want to do something, she will not do it and then you have to bargain with her and she can get really loud and it can get scary but I always have to remember that it is not her, its just how she is.

"She doesn't mean to scare me it just happens. I feel like after a while you kind of get used to it, which you're not supposed to. I know how to handle it."

Her mum, Jackie, said she could was proud of her daughter, who has grown in confidence since becoming involved with West Norfolk Young Carers (WNYC) and meeting young people like herself.

Mrs Haverson said: "Francesca can get very aggressive at times. Lynne is the one that can calm her down. If Francesca did have a seizure, Lynne would know what to do.

"They have a typical sister relationship and Lynne also has this caring role. They [WNYC] gave her an understanding she is not the only young person with a sibling with a disability. It gave her support as well, friends and the confidence to go out and tell other people. She believes that people should know not just about young carers but young people looking after and helping siblings with a disability."

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