Brother and sister brave daily dip in icy river

Jago Bucher, 12, and sister Florence, 11, are taking part in a swimming challenge in the Little Ouse every day through...

Jago Bucher, 12, and sister Florence, 11, are taking part in a swimming challenge in the Little Ouse every day through February to raise money for children’s charity the NSPCC. - Credit: Georgina Little Photography

Two siblings have been braving the icy depths of the Little Ouse every day to raise money for a children's charity.

Jago Bucher, 12, and sister Florence, 11, from Knettishall near Diss, are taking on a swimming challenge this month to fundraise for the NSPCC.

Jago Bucher, 12, and sister Florence, 11, are taking part in a swimming challenge in the Little Ouse every day through...

Jago Bucher, 12, and sister Florence, 11, are taking part in a swimming challenge in the Little Ouse every day through February to raise money for children’s charity the NSPCC. - Credit: Georgina Little Photography

The pair tried cold water immersion in January with their dad James, who has been wild swimming for years, and wanted to turn the experience into a physical challenge to help other children.

And the recent cold weather has not deterred them.

Their dad said: "At first, we started slowly and only did maybe 30 seconds, but we’ve built it up and as part of the challenge we have to be fully immersed, up to our necks, for 60 seconds or more.

Florence, 11, pictured with family during swimming session on February 7 for children’s charity the NSPCC.

Florence, 11, pictured with family during swimming session on February 7 for children’s charity the NSPCC. - Credit: Georgina Little Photography


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"There’s snow on the ground at the moment, so it feels so much harder, but we’re all just as eager as ever.”

He added wild swimming, with air temperatures in sub-zero ranges, could be dangerous if you did not carry out proper research and approach cold water with caution.

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He said: "We wear neoprene gloves and socks, and woolly hats, to make sure we protect our extremities and don’t lose much heat through our heads.

“You can’t just dive in either, you need to start on the banks and slowly move into the water to get your body used to the water temperatures.

"And, of course, Nina, Jago and Florence’s mum, is always on the bank waiting for us with dry towels to make sure everyone warms up safely.”

The NSPCC is a charity "very close" to the children's grandma Lisa, 80, who has been raising money for it since the age of seven after being given a NSPCC collection box.

Nina said: “We’re all keenly aware there are so many children that will need to call Childline at the moment. It was important for us to help the NSPCC so they can continue to support any child who needs help.”

The children have so far raised more than £4,000 after exceeding the target of £1,000.

Childline is operating 365 days a year for any child or young person who needs help and support.

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