Is the end in sight for roundabout flash flooding saga?

Flooding in Burgh Road, Gorleston, on Sunday, August 28.

Flooding in Burgh Road, Gorleston, on Sunday, August 28. - Credit: Chris Stanton

A long running flooding saga could be coming to an end after nearly a decade, but not for at least another 18 months.

Flooding in Burgh Road, Gorleston in July 2016 where the fire brigade were called to pump water away

Flooding in Burgh Road, Gorleston in July 2016 where the fire brigade were called to pump water away after a sharp heavy downpour of rain. Photo: George Ryan - Credit: Archant

There has been a severe problem with surface water flooding in Gorleston since 2009, with drains overflowing and raw sewage flowing into people's homes and back gardens.

The area around the White Horse roundabout has been particularly badly hit, where even short bursts of rain cause floods.

A pensioner, who lives nearby in Beccles Road, said after just 25 minutes of rain last Friday, his home was hit.

He added: 'I'm sandbagging every time it rains. I shouldn't have to. It's not just dirty water, it's sewage as well.

The White Horse Roundabout in Gorleston. Picture: David Hannant

The White Horse Roundabout in Gorleston. Picture: David Hannant - Credit: Picture: David Hannant


You may also want to watch:


'I can't sell my house because I have to notify them it's in a flood area.'

A woman who also lives in the same street said her family home flooded twice with sewage in July and they had to pay for a deep clean both times.

Most Read

She added: 'We both work so we can't put sandbags down in time if there's torrential rain.'

Now, Anglian Water is exploring options to alleviate problems in the area, but nothing will be done for another 18 months at least.

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft - Credit: Archant

Area manager at Anglian Water Hugh Crerand spoke to the Gorleston Area Committee meeting on Tuesday evening.

He briefed around 30 residents, who then shared their problems with him and expressed their disappointment that after years of pleading for action, they would have to wait months for a solution.

One said it was 'absolutely disgusting.'

Mr Crerand responded: 'I accept we haven't solved your problems overnight, but there are people working on this. There's a lot of pressure on to resolve this.'

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft - Credit: Archant

Chairman of the area committee Trevor Wainwright said the flooding had got worse in the past ten years.

A number of issues were causing the worsening of the flooding, including climate change, the poor state of the dykes system of drainage, and an increase of driveways and hard surfaces which do not allow water to soak away.

Bradwell borough councillor Graham Plant also agreed the dyke system was an issue.

He said: 'The dyke system has been abused by builders and farmers.

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft - Credit: Archant

'They used to be linked up but not they're in a field and don't go anywhere. The system is broken.'

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft - Credit: Archant

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft

Flash flooding in Caister on Friday. Photo: Ty Wheatcroft - Credit: Archant

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus