Inquest hears final words of man who died after 14-hour police stand-off in Costessey

Kamal Nour died during the 14 hour siege in Queen's Hill. Photo: Steve Adams

Kamal Nour died during the 14 hour siege in Queen's Hill. Photo: Steve Adams - Credit: Archant

A man who died following a police stand-off told officers he would be 'gone' by the time they gained entry to his home.

The mother of Kamal Nour, Norma Nour said she was not contacted during the 14 hour siege in Queen's

The mother of Kamal Nour, Norma Nour said she was not contacted during the 14 hour siege in Queen's Hill that resulted in her son dying. Photo: Steve Adams - Credit: Archant

The final words spoken by Kamal Nour to police negotiators were revealed today during the third day of an inquest into his death.

He was found dead by officers at his Quarry Road flat in Costessey on August 14, 2014 after barricading himself inside for around 14 hours.

Norfolk Coroner's Court heard how the last moment of contact with the 40-year-old took place around 6.10pm - several hours after negotiations began.

Giving evidence, a detective sergeant who was coordinating negotiations said: 'At this point I would describe Mr Nour as being fairly desperate. He was upset and said 'I have got it set up and I will be gone. It will take you 20 minutes to get in.''

Kamal Nour died in the police stand-off at Queen's Hills in Costessey in August 2014. Photo: Archant

Kamal Nour died in the police stand-off at Queen's Hills in Costessey in August 2014. Photo: Archant - Credit: Archant

'He was asked what he meant by this and he said 'I will be dead.''

The inquest previously heard that when police eventually forced entry to his flat Mr Nour had hung himself.

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Police negotiators used various tactics throughout the stand-off to try and bring the situation to a peaceful resolution.

But the court heard how they were met with hostile reaction from Mr Nour on almost every occasion.

At one point they agreed to collect his prescription medication in an attempt to bring him out of his home.

When asked why police decided not to give him the medicine without supervision, the negotiator said: 'We were unaware of what he had already taken.

'There was a high level of medication prescribed to him and we felt it was something he would need to come out for.'

Mr Nour had previously been diagnosed with hepatitis C and was suffering from deep vein thrombosis.

The inquest is due to continue until Monday.

The Samaritans are available 24/7 by dialling 116 123.

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