How Lowestoft Town’s Crown Meadow is replacing Wembley stadium

Filming took place at Lowestoft Towns Crown Meadow ground as the 1966 World Cup Final highlights wer

Filming took place at Lowestoft Towns Crown Meadow ground as the 1966 World Cup Final highlights were recreated. - Credit: Archant

One is the home of English football and scene of its greatest ever victory.

England captain Bobby Moore receives the trophy from the Queen after his teams win at the 1966 World

England captain Bobby Moore receives the trophy from the Queen after his teams win at the 1966 World Cup final. Picture: PA - Credit: Popperfoto/Getty Images

The other plays host to the somewhat more modest clashes of the Ryman Premier Division, with crowds of under 1,000.

But for a new film marking the 50th anniversary of England's 1966 World Cup triumph, Lowestoft Town's Crown Meadow will be standing in for Wembley Stadium.

The ground has been used to shoot footage for a new exhibition at the National Football Museum, as well as on tours of Wembley Stadium itself.

The footage is part of an 'interactive experience' to recreate the drama of the day, from the fans' perspective.


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Crown Meadow was chosen, because its somewhat rudimentary wooden seating is reminiscent of the Wembley Stadium of the 1960s.

As part of the filming, locals were recruited to play West Germany and England fans, some wearing the flat caps familiar from the era.

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The footage was shot by Immersive VR, a company based in Norwich, which is recreating animated highlights of the day.

The fans were encouraged to wave flags and cheer at various points, which will be interspersed with action from the pitch.

The crew used a 360 degree camera and green screen, to allow them to later add in the background and transport the action from Lowestoft to north London.

The film – which will be shown at the national museum and on Wembley tours for six months – will be viewed by headset, with visitors able to follow a route along Wembley Way towards the twin towers and into the ground.

Paul Garrod, 59, of Kessingland, was among those who took part in filming. 'I watched the World Cup Final when I was 10, on television. I never thought I would get to be part of the crowd. I've been both an English fan and a German fan – it wasn't too enjoyable as a German fan though.'

To make the film as accurate as possible, Matthew Martin – managing director at Immersive VR – said they had to study photos of the old Wembley, which was knocked down in 2002. He added: 'We decided to come to Crown Meadow because it has perfect stand for this – the wooden seats, concrete floor and pretty much perfect pitch.'

The exhibition at the football museum starts on June 24 and will also be available on Facebook and YouTube.

For more information, visit www.immersivevr.co.uk

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