How a Norfolk forest school is teaching children

Forest School Childminding in Attleborough hosts students from the University of Cambridge. Picture

Forest School Childminding in Attleborough hosts students from the University of Cambridge. Picture by Sonya Duncan - Credit: Sonya Duncan © 2016

It's a novel way to teach young children the basic skills of life.

Forest School Childminding in Attleborough hosts students from the University of Cambridge. Picture

Forest School Childminding in Attleborough hosts students from the University of Cambridge. Picture by Sonya Duncan - Credit: Sonya Duncan © 2016

And now the creative syllabus at Forest School Childminding in Attleborough has been shared with students from around the world.

Forest School Childminding in Attleborough hosts students from the University of Cambridge. Picture

Forest School Childminding in Attleborough hosts students from the University of Cambridge. Picture by Sonya Duncan - Credit: Sonya Duncan © 2016

A group of 24 conservation leadership masters candidates from the University of Cambridge has paid a visit to the school to find out how it is making sure its pupils start their education on the right foot.

Forest School Childminding in Attleborough hosts students from the University of Cambridge. Picture

Forest School Childminding in Attleborough hosts students from the University of Cambridge. Picture by Sonya Duncan - Credit: Sonya Duncan

Founder Victoria Furness said each of the masters students was from a different country, which made comparing notes about conservation fascinating.

She said: 'They were absolutely amazing.


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'They were incredible people with incredible stories about what they have done with conservation in their own countries.'

An alternative to traditional nursery schools, the forest school teaches children aged from birth to school-age about the outdoors and how to look after themselves in nature.

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Since launching four years ago, its waiting list is now more than three years long. The school cares for 10 to 15 children on a day-to-day basis, and there are more than 100 families on the register.

Miss Furness said: 'We take our children outside every day. They're taught how to keep themselves warm and hydrated, as well as how to bake bread and grow food. It's teaching them the start of a good life.'

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