Homes plan for former Endeavour Rangers hall in Gorleston

Endeavour Rangers Hall on Nile Road, Gorleston. The former chapel has been sold and developers have

Endeavour Rangers Hall on Nile Road, Gorleston. The former chapel has been sold and developers have submitted planning permisission to build three homes. PHOTO: Nick Butcher - Credit: Nick Butcher

For four decades it was the home of a busy band that was in demand across the borough for festivals and proud civic events.

Endeavour Rangers Hall on Nile Road, Gorleston. The former chapel has been sold and developers have

Endeavour Rangers Hall on Nile Road, Gorleston. The former chapel has been sold and developers have submitted planning permisission to build three homes. PHOTO: Nick Butcher - Credit: Nick Butcher

Now developers are looking to convert an under-used former chapel and community hub into three town houses.

The Endeavour Rangers Hall in Nile Road, Gorleston, was sold last year after interest in the marching band dwindled.

Under the scheme submitted to Great Yarmouth Borough Council the empty hall will be converted into three town houses with five on-site parking spaces.

Although not listed and of little architectural value the hall is a landmark in the town and held in affection locally.


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Built in 1910 the Primitive Methodist Chapel was one of many red-brick halls to spring up across Norfolk - and end up being converted into homes.

It was listed for sale on Rightmove with an auction guide price of £80,000 to £100,000.

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Proceeds from the sale in February last year were used to set up the Endeavour Rangers Community Fund, administered by the Norfolk Community Foundation.

Youth clubs and organisations involved with activities for younger people can apply for a grant of up to £2000 to help with their projects creating a legacy of support.

The marching band was founded in 1975 for boys and girls aged eight and over.

The aim was to get young people interested in music as well as encouraging them to be helpful and respectful members of the community.

Over the years the hall has been variously a chapel, community hall, and also a photographic studio.

In that time it also suffered a devastating fire.

Former trustee Mary Lovewell-Blake said she became involved in the organisation after her year as mayoress in 1982.

At that time the band had a busy programme of events and was asked to perform at carnivals and on civic occasions.

Often, she said, youngsters would join as tots and stay on until they were 16, honing their musical and performance skills.

Having enjoyed a long spell as a popular, community-focused organisation, the final few years were a struggle.

From a heyday peak of more than 30 members, in the end there were just five or six meeting regularly to practise and the decision was made to disband.

A previous application for five town houses was withdrawn.

Neighbours have been asked for their views and anyone interested in the conversion has until February 6 to comment.

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