Welcome to the NEAThome – the bungalow helping in the fight against dementia

The NEAThome (Norwich electronic Assistive Technology) at the UEA, housing the latest assistive livi

The NEAThome (Norwich electronic Assistive Technology) at the UEA, housing the latest assistive living technology to help older people, the disabled and those with dementia. Dr Lisa Tedesco Triccas, lecturer in assistive technology, with the iPad controlling items in the lounge area. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2015

The latest technology for people living with dementia and similar conditions were put on show when a specially-built bungalow at the University of East Anglia opened its doors.

The lounge of the NEAThome (Norwich electronic Assistive Technology) at the UEA, housing the latest

The lounge of the NEAThome (Norwich electronic Assistive Technology) at the UEA, housing the latest assistive living technology to help older people, the disabled and those with dementia. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2015

The Norwich Electronic Assistive Technology home - or NEAThome - at the school of health sciences links education, research, training and product development to demonstrate the devices which can make life easier for elderly and disabled people.

It also allows care workers to train in a realistic environment, and for their progress to be monitored by a series of high-definition cameras relayed to the neighbouring training studio - the first of its kind at a university.

Carers and support workers today saw the latest assistive, adaptive and rehabilitative gadgets, including an iPad app which can be used to open and close doors and windows, control the television and to operate a video intercom system.

Lisa Tedesco Triccas, lecturer in assistive technology at UEA, said: 'These technologies can promote independence and improve quality of life for people living with disabilities or who are older.


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'The NEAThome has been a hugely valuable resource in training our students but we wanted to open the doors so potential users of these technologies, their family members and carers can see them and try them out for themselves.'

The bungalow features a bedroom with adjustable bed and portable hoist, a bathroom with electric bath-chair, and devices which monitor where the resident is sitting or sleeping, to alert a carer to potential falls.

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Other innovations include specialised cutlery for those who struggle to grip, and phones with photographs instead of numbers.

Have you got an innovation? Email mark.shields@archant.co.uk

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