Former president of Norfolk Women’s Bowls Association diagnosed with rare condition

Former president of Norfolk Women's Bowls Association, Margaret Tubby, of Newton St Faith, who has a

Former president of Norfolk Women's Bowls Association, Margaret Tubby, of Newton St Faith, who has a rare condition, multiple system atrophy (MSA), and also she has motor neurone disease. With her is her partner, David Reynel. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2015

When Margaret Tubby was first diagnosed with multiple system atrophy earlier this year, no one expected her condition to decline so rapidly.

Margaret Tubby when she was president of Norfolk Women's Bowls Association. Picture: SUBMITTED

Margaret Tubby when she was president of Norfolk Women's Bowls Association. Picture: SUBMITTED

In just six months the former president of Norfolk Women's Bowls Association lost her ability to speak and walk after she was diagnosed with the neurological disorder.

And now her partner, David Reynel, of Horsham St Faith, wants to raise awareness about the rare condition, which affected around 3,000 people in the UK last year.

The 61 year old said: 'It all started in 2014 when everyone had the flu. We all had a cough that we gradually got rid of, but Margaret didn't.

'She then started slurring her speech a bit and losing her voice. After she was diagnosed in January, we started to live a normal life again, but she then went downhill very quickly.'


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MSA is caused by the degeneration of nerve cells in several areas of the brain, which can result in problems with movement and bodily functions.

In the following months after her diagnosis, Mrs Tubby, 75, lost the use of her right leg and was unable to swallow food.

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She was admitted to hospital in May after suddenly falling forward onto the dining room table and hitting her head.

During her eight week stay, she was also diagnosed with motor neurone disease and can now only communicate through written notes.

Mr Reynel added: 'It all happened much quicker than we expected. We were first told her life expectancy was one to seven years, but now that she has motor neurone disease, they have given her one to three years.

'It's difficult for her because she realises the situation she is in.'

The Norfolk Bowls Association, of which Mrs Tubby was president of the women's section in 2010, is now raising money for the MSA trust to support people with the condition.

For more information on MSA visit www.msatrust.org.uk

Do you have a health story? Call Nicholas Carding on 01603 772439

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