Former Norwich City star Cedric Anselin urges men to talk about their mental health

Cedric Anselin, who is speaking at the Men's Wellbeing and Mental Health Awareness Day about his men

Cedric Anselin, who is speaking at the Men's Wellbeing and Mental Health Awareness Day about his mental health experiences. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

It is okay for men to not be okay.

Gabriel Abotsie, men's wellbeing nursing lead, speaks at the Men's Wellbeing and Mental Health Aware

Gabriel Abotsie, men's wellbeing nursing lead, speaks at the Men's Wellbeing and Mental Health Awareness Day. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

That was the overwhelming message from former Norwich City star Cedric Anselin, pictured right.

The ex-footballer, who also played for Bordeaux, last year told how he had been battling depression for the past 14 years and had thought about taking his own life.

Anselin, who has since become a men's mental health ambassador, told his story at a Men's Wellbeing and Mental Health Awareness Day in Norwich.

He said: 'I'm proud to talk about depression, I'm proud to talk about my experience - I'm not ashamed anymore.


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'It's part of my life and will always be part of my life for the rest of my life.'

Anselin said it was vital for men to 'talk, talk, talk' about their mental health and break that stigma that surrounds men's mental health.

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He said: 'To be honest some friends of mine said man up, be a good father, don't cry and those words can really hurt.'

Anselin said when you are in a 'very dark place' words like that can have a really negative impact.

The Frenchman insisted it was okay to not be okay but urged anyone in that position to talk to others and seek the help that was out there.

He said : 'It's very important for any man, any age to talk about depression or mental health or if they don't feel well inside their mind.'

Anselin was a key speaker at the event, held at the King's Centre, King Street on Thursday (November 23).

The event, organised by the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, heard that men were three times more likely to take their own lives than women.

Gabriel Abotsie, men's wellbeing nursing lead for the NSFT, said they were trying to break stereotypes of masculinity among men.

He said: 'Just making them aware that it's okay for them to ask for help.'

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