Generous EDP readers thanked for helping Unicef’s Hurricane Irma appeal

On 13 September, children and adults gather around Unicef deputy representative for the Eastern and

On 13 September, children and adults gather around Unicef deputy representative for the Eastern and Caribbean Area Muriel Mafico (in blue top), who is unpacking Unicef educational and recreational supplies for a distribution, at the Antigua Recreation Ground. Picture: Unicef/Moreno Gonza - Credit: © UNICEF/UN0121372/Moreno Gonza

Readers of the Eastern Daily Press have been thanked for their generosity in giving to an appeal set up in response to this month's devastating Hurricane Irma.

In Ouanaminthe, Haiti, a girl shelter inside. Several temporary shelters are open to communities mos

In Ouanaminthe, Haiti, a girl shelter inside. Several temporary shelters are open to communities most at risk in the north of Haiti to protect them from the impact of Hurricane Irma. Logistics teams in the area offer safety instructions and news about the hurricane. Picture: Unicef/Bradley - Credit: © UNICEF/UN0119992/Bradley

The most power hurricane ever formed in the Atlantic left more than 100 people dead and thousands of homes and even entire communities destroyed.

But thanks to the donations of EDP readers and others from around the world, relief work by organisations such as Unicef UK are already well underway.

The British-based children's charity is putting those desperately-needed pounds to use on island such as Dominica, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, supplying families with food, water and shelter.

And this year's hurricane season is not over yet.

In Ouanaminthe, Haiti, the area of Gaia is most affected by the hurricane Irma. Thousands of familie

In Ouanaminthe, Haiti, the area of Gaia is most affected by the hurricane Irma. Thousands of families, including many who are farmers, have had their homes and fields covered with mud. Unicef team members went to the area to assess the damage where locals were busy with the clean-up. Picture: Unicef/Bradley - Credit: © UNICEF/UN0120000/Bradley


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Hurricane Maria is now advancing on the same Caribbean islands that took the brunt of Irma's wrath.

Mike Penrose, Unicef UK executive director, said: 'The devastating impact of Hurricane Irma has left millions of children in danger across the Caribbean and now Maria, the third hurricane in two weeks, has torn through Dominica, leaving houses and structures flattened and thousands more children and families at risk.

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'The money we raise here in the UK will provide life-saving aid to meet the immediate needs of children and families and help them recover.

'I would like to thank the Eastern Daily Press and its readers for the commitment and generosity they have shown to Unicef during emergencies – your ongoing support will have a real impact on the lives of children.'

In Ouanaminthe, Haiti, the area of Gaia is most affected by the hurricane Irma. Thousands of familie

In Ouanaminthe, Haiti, the area of Gaia is most affected by the hurricane Irma. Thousands of families, including many who are farmers, have had their homes and fields covered with mud. Unicef team members went to the area to assess the damage where locals were busy with the clean-up. Picture: Unicef/Bradley - Credit: © UNICEF/UN0120004/Bradley

And the scars that such a natural disaster leaves are not only physical.

Unicef is also providing psychological support to children affected by the tragedy on island including Barbuda.

Khin-Sandi Lwin, Unicef's representative for the eastern Caribbean, said: 'These children witnessed a horrific hurricane that tore their homes away, destroyed their schools and left the island they called home totally in tatters.

'They will need lots of help to deal with the trauma associated with those experiences.

In Ouanaminthe, Haiti, people take shelter. Several temporary shelters are open to communities most

In Ouanaminthe, Haiti, people take shelter. Several temporary shelters are open to communities most at risk in the north of Haiti to protect them from the impact of Hurricane Irma. Logistics teams in the area offer safety instructions and news about the hurricane. Picture: Unicef/Bradley - Credit: © UNICEF/UN0119989/Bradley

'This programme is aimed at starting that process.'

n To find out more about the work Unicef UK is doing, or to donate to the appeal, visit unicef.uk/edp

Haiti outside the town of Ouanaminthe, where several small villages suffered significant damages cau

Haiti outside the town of Ouanaminthe, where several small villages suffered significant damages caused by Hurricane Irma, houses are flooded and many people have lost their belongings. Picture: Unicef/Bradley - Credit: © UNICEF/UN0120005/Bradley

Tiquania Lewis, 2, left, and her sister, Tiquanisha, 5, plays on a swing tied to a tree, near fallen

Tiquania Lewis, 2, left, and her sister, Tiquanisha, 5, plays on a swing tied to a tree, near fallen trees and debris outside their home, on the island of Anguilla,� which was hard hit during Hurricane Irma. Picture: Unicef - Credit: © UNICEF/UN0120821/English

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