GALLERY: Ian Botham’s charity walk in Norfolk and Coltishall today - with Spandau Ballet drummer John Keeble

Legendary cricketer turned legendary fundraiser Sir Ian 'Beefy' Botham was in Norfolk today, walking to raise money for Beefy's Great British Walk 2012. Norwich was the eighth leg of the 10-day challenge in which Beefy is visiting 10 cities in 10 days to raise money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Research Charity.

Legendary cricketer turned legendary fundraiser Sir Ian 'Beefy' Botham was in Norfolk today, walking to raise money for Beefy's Great British Walk 2012. Norwich was the eighth leg of the 10-day challenge in which Beefy is visiting 10 cities in 10 days to raise money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Research Charity.

The former England star, who has helped to raise over �13 million for Leukemia and Lymphoma Research in the last 27 years, was joined by former Norwich City footballer Jeremy Goss as well as hit 80s Spandau Ballet drummer John Keeble to complete the eighth day of the charity walk.

He said: 'The thing which really drives us on is the success rate of the charity. When we started in 1993 the survival rate for people with leukaemia was just 25%; today it is over 93% so there are lots of reasons to keep going with fundraising.'

The walk started in Norwich city centre where Sir Ian and his team of fundraisers walked through the city to raise awareness for the charity and collect money from the public. He then arrived at Wroxham railway station at 1pm where he was joined by around 100 members of the public to complete the final 4 miles of the walk.

The walk continued along the Bure Valley railway footpath, where Botham and his charity walkers were able to take in the scenic Norfolk countryside, and ended outside Norfolk Guide Association Activities Centre in Coltishall.

Friends and family joined Sir Ian on his walk. David Chisnell, a former Coltishall landlord, has been walking with Sir Ian since 1989: 'We've gone a long way and we've got a lot further to go and we'll keep walking until we get there.'

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Yesterday was the shortest route they have ever walked and Mr Chisnell added, 'Beefy is convinced there are no hills in Norfolk' despite the route taking them over Mousehold Heath.

John Keeble, the drummer from Spandau Ballet, was 'just chipping in' for the day: 'It's just a fantastic cause. I got to know Ian pretty well as I used to play a bit of charity cricket, and he's obviously a bit of a hero.

'There's always an affiliation between sports and music, you get to travel the world and do something you love.'

Former Norwich City footballer, Jeremy Goss, also joined Sir Ian for the eighth leg of the walk to return a favour from 1993: 'I am here to support Ian Botham on his fantastic Great Britain walk and for me to congratulate him because he turned up to my testimonial golf day in 1993.'

Mr Goss was also raising money for the Norfolk and Norwich Association for the Blind.

Professor David MacEwan from the UEA School of Pharmacy was out with his whole lab collecting money for the charity: 'We have been lucky enough to get some considerate funding from Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research and we are very happy to get involved and try and raise some more money so hopefully it gets put back into Norfolk'

About 25 people set off from City Hall at 11.30 yesterday for the walk from Norwich to Wroxham, where they were met by around 100 members of the public for the short four mile walk along the Bure Valley Railway into Coltishall.

In the past eight days, Beefy has raised more than �200,000 through collections alone and he plans to make much more on the remaining days of the walking challenge.

'We haven't got a big magic wand we can wave to come up with results for the charity, so we have to raise as much money as we can to add to the big research pot' explained Sir Ian.

He added: 'If in 27 years we can make the inroads to understand and treat one kind of cancer, what roads can be made in other forms of cancer if we keep going?'

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