How to make 'easy to perfect' traditional fruit scones

Charlotte Bennett, of Bobbin's Bakes in Boughton, gives us her traditional fruit scone recipe.

Charlotte Bennett, of Bobbin's Bakes in Boughton, gives us her traditional fruit scone recipe. - Credit: Charlotte Bennett

If you're looking for a straightforward recipe to take care of afternoon tea, this traditional fruit scone may be what you need.

Charlotte Bennett, from Boughton, near Stoke Ferry, runs Bobbin's Bakes with her partner Jody - a business that she said is going from "strength to strength" after making some afternoon teas for vulnerable friends and relatives during the first lockdown.

Charlotte Bennett, of Bobbin's Bakes in Boughton, gives us her traditional fruit scone recipe.

Charlotte Bennett, of Bobbin's Bakes in Boughton, gives us her traditional fruit scone recipe. - Credit: Charlotte Bennett

The 31-year-old added: "I left them on their doorsteps, popped a few photos on to my personal social media and I had so many requests within just a few hours, I haven’t looked back since.

Charlotte Bennett, of Bobbin's Bakes in Boughton, gives us her traditional fruit scone recipe.

Charlotte Bennett, of Bobbin's Bakes in Boughton, gives us her traditional fruit scone recipe. - Credit: Charlotte Bennett

"The traditional fruit scone, which is one of my most popular sellers and part of every afternoon tea, is simple to make and easy to perfect with a few know how tips."

Traditional fruit scone

"Tips: Ensure the butter is cold – straight from the fridge. Dip your cutter into flour each time you cut out a scone – the sharper the cutter edge the better the rise.

Charlotte Bennett's two-year-old daughter Lily.

Charlotte Bennett's two-year-old daughter Lily. - Credit: Charlotte Bennett

"Warm the milk slightly before adding it to your dry mixture."

Most Read

Ingredients:

  • 90g unsalted butter
  • 360g self raising flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 3 tbsp of caster sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 175ml of full fat milk 
  • 110g sultanas
  • Beaten egg to glaze
  • Fruit jam and clotted cream to serve
Charlotte Bennett's two-year-old daughter Lily.

Charlotte Bennett's two-year-old daughter Lily. - Credit: Charlotte Bennett

Method:

  1. Line a baking tray with greaseproof paper.
  2. Pre heat the oven to 200C (fan).
  3. Mix the flour, baking powder, salt and butter either in a food mixer or with your fingers until the mixture looks like fine crumbs.
  4. Stir in the sugar, form a well in the centre of the dry mixture and pour in you slightly warm milk, mix well until all the ingredients are thoroughly combined.
  5. Scatter the sultanas into the dough and fold well until they are evenly distributed through the dough.
  6. Scatter some self raising flour onto your clean work surface, take your dough and using a floured rolling pin lightly roll the dough until it is 4cm to 4.5cm thick.
  7. Take a 5cm round smooth edge cutter and dip it into your flour before cutting each scone and placing them onto your lined baking tray, repeat until you have used all your dough, brush the top of each scone with the beaten egg.
  8. Place your baking tray into the oven and bake for approximately 10 to 12 minutes or until they are risen and lightly golden on the top.
  9. Once cooled serve with a good quality fruit jam and clotted cream, along with a lovely cup of good old English tea.
Charlotte Bennett, of Bobbin's Bakes in Boughton, gives us her traditional fruit scone recipe.

Charlotte Bennett, of Bobbin's Bakes in Boughton, gives us her traditional fruit scone recipe. - Credit: Charlotte Bennett

Following the growth of the business, Bobbin's Bakes has carried out "extensive renovations" which includes the addition of three full size ovens to keep up with demand.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus