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Maths marvel perfectly recites the first 156 digits of pi

PUBLISHED: 11:23 10 July 2019 | UPDATED: 11:59 10 July 2019

Finlay, a pupil at Beeston Hall School, in Beeston Regis near Sheringham, recently took part in a pi recital competition, reciting the first 156 digits perfectly. Picture: BEESTON HALL

Finlay, a pupil at Beeston Hall School, in Beeston Regis near Sheringham, recently took part in a pi recital competition, reciting the first 156 digits perfectly. Picture: BEESTON HALL

Archant

While many of us might struggle to remember what we had for breakfast, one north Norfolk schoolboy has committed an impressive amount of numbers to memory.

Finlay, a pupil at Beeston Hall School, in Beeston Regis near Sheringham, recently took part in a pi recital competition, reciting the first 156 digits perfectly. Picture: BEESTON HALLFinlay, a pupil at Beeston Hall School, in Beeston Regis near Sheringham, recently took part in a pi recital competition, reciting the first 156 digits perfectly. Picture: BEESTON HALL

Children at Beeston Hall School, in Beeston Regis near Sheringham, recently took part in a pi recital competition.

And although many impressive numbers were reached, one pupil manage to recite the first 156 digits of pi perfectly.

Maths teacher Matt Whitaker, who organised the competition, said winning pupil Finlay "passed all expectations."

He added: "All of the children worked exceptionally hard on learning this very difficult sequence of numbers, but Finlay was the star of the show."

Finlay said: "I practised hard and was really pleased to win.

"I'm usually good at remembering things in other lessons like Latin."

In March this year, the value of the number pi was calculated to a new world record length of 31 trillion digits, far past the previous record of 22 trillion.

A Google employee from Japan, named Emma Haruka Iwao, found the new digits by using the company's cloud computing service.

Pi is the number you get when you divide a circle's circumference by its diameter.

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It is the same infinite number for all circles.

And while the first digits 3.14 are well known, the number is infinitely long.

For those interested in Finlay's perfectly recited 156 digits, they are as follows:

3.14159265358979323846

2643383279502884197169

3993751058209749445923

0781640628620899862803

4825342117067982148086

5132823066470938446095

5058223172535940812848

1117.

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