Find out how well your child’s school did in the latest GCSE league table

The Department for Education has ranked Norfolk and Waveney secondary schools' performance in a leag

The Department for Education has ranked Norfolk and Waveney secondary schools' performance in a league table. Picture: David Davies/PA Wire - Credit: PA

A national school league table shows GCSE performance dipped in Norfolk in 2019.

The Department for Education (DfE) has scored every state school in the country based on how much progress students made between key stage 2 and key stage 4 across eight subjects.

Schools are given a score typically between -1 and 1, with negative numbers indicating how much pupils were underperforming when compared to students nationally who achieved the same level in primary school tests.

The overall score for Norfolk in 2019 went down slightly from 0 in 2018 to -0.01 last year.

Ormiston Venture Academy, in Gorleston, had the highest Progress 8 score of 0.78, followed by Notre Dame High School, in Norwich, with 0.5 and Hethersett Academy with 0.47.

Simon Gilbert-Barnham, principal of Ormiston Venture Academy. Picture: James Bass

Simon Gilbert-Barnham, principal of Ormiston Venture Academy. Picture: James Bass - Credit: James Bass


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Simon Gilbert-Barnham, principal at Ormiston Venture Academy, said: "We are delighted with the achievements of our students, which are down to the hard work and commitment of students, staff and our wider community across the board."

Hethersett Academy also had one of the highest English and maths GCSE pass rates for a state school in 2019, at 82pc.

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Gareth Stevens, principal at Hethersett Academy, said: "I'm often asked how our school manages to rival independent schools - and the answer is hard work, a rich curriculum and support.

"We also have three extended school days per week where our students can explore music, art and sports.

"It's important that our students have the fullest education possible, including, where we can, the enrichment opportunities offered to children at independent schools."

Trailing at the bottom of the table for Norfolk and Waveney is The Ashley School in Lowestoft, with a score of -1.56 based on 20 students.

But the special school said the score was "meaningless" as only a handful of pupils would be able to take the exams.

Headteacher Sally Garrett said: "We are one of the only special schools that will appear in the table. In one way we are exceptional in that we do help those that can access these GCSEs."

Hethersett Academy had the highest pass rate for English and maths GCSEs for a state school in 2019.

Hethersett Academy had the highest pass rate for English and maths GCSEs for a state school in 2019. Byline: Sonya Duncan - Credit: Sonya Duncan

Also scoring low points were the Universal Technical College Norfolk (UTCN), in Norwich, with -1.04 and KES Academy, in King's Lynn, with -0.73.

UTCN headteacher Alex Hayes said the league tables were not devised with university technical colleges in mind, as UTCN takes on students from Year 10.

He said: "50pc of our leavers go onto apprenticeships at some of the country's top employers, including Jaguar Land Rover, Aviva and Lotus."

A spokesman from KES Academy said around 60 students were part-way through courses that did not count towards the Progress 8 measure in 2019.

He said: "We did the right thing and supported them to complete their courses but it has had an inevitable impact on the tables this year.

"We always want to see our students do as well as possible, and our teachers are working hard to improve things in a sustainable way but it does take time - and we will always put our students' best interests ahead of playing to league tables."

Figures also show girls were passing English and maths at a higher rate than boys in Norfolk and Waveney.

Girls are ahead by 8pc when it comes to achieving a grade four or above - the equivalent of the former A-C grades - in English and maths, with 67pc of girls obtaining the grades in 2019 compared to 59pc of boys.

Sally Garrett, headteacher of The Ashley School, Lowestoft. Picture: Nick Butcher

Sally Garrett, headteacher of The Ashley School, Lowestoft. Picture: Nick Butcher - Credit: Nick Butcher

The pass rates are slightly higher than the national average of 64pc for girls and 56pc for boys.

However, figures show more than a third of students in Norfolk and Waveney are leaving school without basic English and maths skills.

The average pass rate for state schools reached 63pc in 2019, which is slightly higher than the previous year's rate of 62pc and the national average of 60pc.

Meanwhile, independent school pupils excelled in the subjects, with Norwich School achieving a 100pc pass rate last year.

Steffan Griffiths, headmaster of Norwich School. Picture: Archant Library

Steffan Griffiths, headmaster of Norwich School. Picture: Archant Library - Credit: Submitted

Norwich School headmaster Steffan Griffiths said: "We try hard to provide both a framework of expert staffing and relevant facilities which ensures that there is appropriate support for each and every pupil.

"We encourage our pupils to make use of these resources over the many months of their GCSE courses so that they can optimise their performance in the examinations themselves."

King Edward VII Academy, in King's Lynn, had one of the lowest Progress 8 scores in the county. Pict

King Edward VII Academy, in King's Lynn, had one of the lowest Progress 8 scores in the county. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: IAN BURT

The Department for Education has ranked Norfolk and Waveney secondary schools' performance in a leag

The Department for Education has ranked Norfolk and Waveney secondary schools' performance in a league table. Picture: Norwich School - Credit: Norwich School

Schools with the best Progress 8 scores in 2019

Schools with the best Progress 8 scores in 2019 - Credit: Archant

Schools with the worst Progress 8 scores in 2019

Schools with the worst Progress 8 scores in 2019 - Credit: Archant

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