Norfolk schools urged to follow suit as log classrooms unveiled at Sheringham Primary

Sheringham Primary School opens its log cabin classrooms. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Sheringham Primary School opens its log cabin classrooms. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

Headteachers would be 'mad not to' consider replacing mobile classrooms with log cabins.

Sheringham Primary School opens its new log cabin classrooms. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Sheringham Primary School opens its new log cabin classrooms. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

That was the claim as Sheringham Primary School officially unveiled three log cabin classrooms in its playground today.

After watching Sheringham mayor Doug Smith and school governors' chairman Carole Fields do the honours helped by 20 pupils, Headteacher Dominic Cragoe said the new rooms were 'cost-effective, environmentally friendly and conducive to good quality learning'.

The three rooms, which can accommodate 90 pupils, were needed because the mobiles were cold and draughty in the winter and too hot in the summer.

There was also the enviable issue of rising pupil numbers, with Sheringham Primary the biggest primary school in Norfolk with 604 pupils.


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Mr Cragoe said: 'We previously had three mobiles, which were grotty to say the least.

'We were in negotiations with the local authority to get them removed, but we are at 604 pupils and we needed to place pupils somewhere.

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'The local authority agreed, rather than give us replacement mobiles at a stupid cost, we would match fund 50pc towards the cost of more sustainable log classrooms.'

The school has a double and a single classroom, one of which is being used by year six pupils, another as a music room and the other for 'overspill'.

Mr Cragoe said they cost a total of £210,000, and could last for between 50-300 years, depending on how well they were looked after.

He added: 'They use the thickest wood they can. The mobiles were freezing in the winter and very damp. They had single-skin windows and were red hot in the summer. They were also very crowded.

'I think schools would be mad not to consider this as a way forward.'

Mr Cragoe said school numbers were expected to continue to rise, but added that the improvements meant the school was 'well placed' to cope with the additional students as it was today.

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