“My reward was not completely disgracing my poor dad” - reporters recall rewards for exam results

Reporter Alex Hurrell said she did no work at all for two years towards her biology O-level. PHOTO:

Reporter Alex Hurrell said she did no work at all for two years towards her biology O-level. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

Although many people may have the impression that we live in a world of bling and material rewards for success, it seems that for most EDP reporters their prizes for succeeding in their GCSEs were of a simpler variety.

Alex Hurrell said: 'Having done no work at all for two years towards my biology O-level, my dad was horrified at the thought I might fail it so he tutored me himself intensively for two weeks.

'I scraped a C. My reward was not completely disgracing my poor dad, a doctor.'

Shan Ellis said: 'I got a trip to Alton Towers from my GCSE results, plus a family meal (no small deal as there were 30 of us around a table). My sister got a flute.

'But they were unexpected gifts, we weren't told about them while we were studying.


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'I know for a fact that one of my friends has been using the carrot/stick technique with her son, and has been flaunting an iPad in front of him while he was studying which will, with luck, be his tomorrow.'

Donna-Louise Bishop said: 'I was never rewarded for any of my exams and, to be honest, just hearing a simple 'well done, we're proud of you' from my parents was enough to make my day.'

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Rosa McMahon said: 'I didn't get a car, or a wedge of cash ... just a meal out and a hug.'

Martin George said his real celebration was a party with friends in one of their caravans on results day night, and the celebration with family was a more sedate meal at an Indian restaurant.

It is a tradition that seems to be continuing, with one EDP reader, Steve, leaving a comment on our website: 'It'll be a restaurant for a decent lunch (his request) with a cider to celebrate. However, he's already looking to his A-levels and has been doing the preparation work over the summer break.'

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