Green-thinking pupils get warm praise for their work on Oxburgh Hall’s cold-frame

The new plant cold store was opened in the kitchen garden at Oxburgh Hall, after it was built by pup

The new plant cold store was opened in the kitchen garden at Oxburgh Hall, after it was built by pupils from the Iceni Academy - From left. Rosie Morris, Luke Johnson and James Morris use the store. Picture: Matthew Usher. - Credit: Matthew Usher

Green-thinking youngsters have been praised for the work they have carried out for a nearby country estate.

The new plant cold store was opened in the kitchen garden at Oxburgh Hall, after it was built by pup

The new plant cold store was opened in the kitchen garden at Oxburgh Hall, after it was built by pupils from the Iceni Academy - From left, Luke Johnson, Megan Rayner, Bethany Goldsworthy, Alisha Reeves, Rosie Morris, Rosie Soltani and James Morris with the cold store. Picture: Matthew Usher. - Credit: Matthew Usher

Pupils from Iceni Academy in Methwold, near Swaffham, have built a cold-frame for the National Trust's Oxburgh Hall.

The project has seen members of the school's after-school club, Green Power, learn brick-laying, carpentry and painting skills to build the facility which is used for plants.

Much of the work has been carried out in their own time, under the watchful eye of their teacher, Julian Moy.

The students were yesterday presented with certificates and joined officials from the 15th century manor house for a lunch as a token of the estate's appreciation.


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Helen Gregory, Oxburgh Hall's outdoors manager, said: 'We are extremely grateful to the students. We'd had our cold-frame since the 1950s and it was getting worn and needed to be replaced. We could've gone out and got a contractor to do the work but at the National Trust we are keen to work with the local community, especially with young people learning new skills.'

A cold-frame is likened to a half-way house for plants or cuttings and is used as a stepping stone for plants or cuttings which have been grown in a greenhouse before they are planted outside to help them acclimatise to the outdoor temperatures.

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The rectangular-shaped frame, built by the students, is eight bricks high with a glass lid.

The windows are at a 45 degree angle.

The students, aged between 11 and 14, took between five and six months to complete the project.

They were presented with their certificates by Oxburgh Hall general manager Teresa Squires.

Are you helping youngsters to develop their skills through an innovative partnership? Email kate.scotter@archant.co.uk.

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