Do you remember the Great Storm of 1987? Get in touch to share your stories

Yarmouth gale damage University Crescent Brenda Edwards conservatory 16 oct 1987
L0163

Yarmouth gale damage University Crescent Brenda Edwards conservatory 16 oct 1987 L0163 - Credit: Archant

Thirty years ago, our region was rocked by a huge storm which caused widespread devastation and destruction in its wake.

Chris Everett and his daughters, Alice, left, and Lucy try to clear up rubble at their home after th

Chris Everett and his daughters, Alice, left, and Lucy try to clear up rubble at their home after the 1987 storm. Photo from Archant Library. - Credit: Archant Library.

On the morning of October 16, 1987, people awoke to find hurricane force winds had forced down power lines, destroyed cars and uprooted millions of trees.

As we approach the 30th anniversary of that historic day we want to share your memories and photographs.

Just the night before, in what would be the most infamous blunder of his career, former BBC weatherman Michael Fish assured viewers that reports of a potential hurricane were unfounded.

'Earlier on today apparently a woman rang the BBC and said she heard there was a hurricane on the way,' Mr Fish told viewers.


You may also want to watch:


'Well if you're watching, don't worry, there isn't.'

He then goes on to say that 'actually, the weather will become very windy.'

Most Read

But the strong winds of the Great Storm reached 120mph along the Norfolk coast, with the most severe being felt in Gorleston where it peaked at 122mph.

Close to 120,000 homes were without power and some 200 schools were forced to close after many had suffered damage, including Oriel High in Gorleston, St Mary's Catholic School in Yarmouth, Acle Primary Blackdale Middle School.

Swathes of caravans were swept into the sea along the coast and a container ship, the Duke of Yare, almost capsized in the North Sea where the waves reached almost 100ft.

Norfolk suffered a tragedy when west Norfolk farmer, Sidney Riches, died in a collision on the A10 in Tottenhill, near King's Lynn, where it was partly blocked by a fallen tree.

The storm killed 18 people and lifted 15m trees off the ground along its path in southern and eastern England, crashing down on houses, roads, power lines and cars.

In the aftermath, the UK was left dealing with £2b worth of damage, making it the most expensive weather related disaster at that time.

As the 30th anniversary of that fateful day approaches next week, many will remember where they were and how they felt when one of the worst storms in living memory ripped through our streets.

Do you remember the Great Storm of 1987? If so, we'd like to hear from you. Send your stories and pictures to newsdesk@archant.co.uk or call us on 01603 628311.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter