David Bellamy goes wild about the Wensum

It probably won't quite catch on in the same way as Peter Crouch's famous robot dance, but naturalist David Bellamy entertained a crowd at the weekend by dancing like a crane.

It probably won't quite catch on in the same way as Peter Crouch's famous robot dance, but naturalist David Bellamy entertained a crowd at the weekend by dancing like a crane.

Prof Bellamy was at Pensthorpe nature reserve, near Fakenham, officially to open a Wild About The Wensum day featuring more than 60 environmental and conservation organisations.

Chairman of the Pensthorpe Conservation Trust, Prof Bellamy gave a speech before giving his brief version of a crane dance.

It was not just a random choice - a new conservation centre at Pensthorpe incorporates a purpose-built cranery housing the largest collection of cranes in the country, including eight of the world's 15 species.

The event on Saturday was designed to celebrate the natural history and cultural heritage of the Wensum Valley which is designated a special area for conservation. The Wensum is the only river between the Thames and the Humber to have the designation and is famed for its chalk stream fauna, such as the white-clawed crayfish, dragonflies and otters.

Activities included storytelling, guided walks, bird watching, nature quizzes, local craft demonstrations, puppet-making, face painting and folk dancing.

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Prof Bellamy gave a talk entitled “The Wensum Valley From Caveman to Cranes” and there were other discussions held on wetlands, dragonflies and coastal wildlife.

“No one landholder or organisation alone can conserve the amazing biodiversity and cultural heritage of the Wensum Valley,” he said.

“But by working together their combined strength can be harnessed to keep the river and its valley in prime ecological working order for generations to come.”

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