‘Normally charming’ man fell out with neighbour over noise in lockdown

Nigel Cubitt fell out with a neighbour in Pelham Road, Norwich, over noise complaints. Picture: Goog

Nigel Cubitt fell out with a neighbour in Pelham Road, Norwich, over noise complaints. Picture: Google - Credit: Google

A normally “charming” man fell out with a neighbour during lockdown which led to him shouting abuse at her, a court heard.

Nigel Cubitt, 53, who has lived in the block of flats in Pelham Road, in Norwich, for 33 years, fell out with a neighbour living in the flat above over noise, Norwich Crown Court heard.

Joanne Eley, prosecuting, said there had been some issues about noise between the neighbours but on April 16, this year, there was an argument during which Mr Cubitt shouted abuse and swore at his neighbour.

She said a witness reported a plant pot being thrown, but could not say from where it came from, and Cubitt was heard using abusive language.

Cubitt, of Pelham Road, Norwich, admitted threatening behaviour on April 16, this year.


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A charge of being in possession of an axe was not proceeded with as the Miss Eley said that there was no evidence of any weapon.

John Morgans, for Cubitt, said that he was normally a charming and gentle man.

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“This was so obviously very out of character. He is 53 years old with no convictions. He is a gentle character and genuinely charming.”

He said the neighbour still lived in the block of flats but there had been no repeat of any confrontation, and no complaints in regard to his behaviour.

Mr Morgans said coming to court had been a worrying experience for Cubitt, who had lived in the flat for 33 years, but was now considering moving.

Judge Maureen Bacon imposed a conditional discharge for six months and told him that her concern was that there was no further trouble.

“You behaved badly on this day and used bad language.”

She said he must stay away from trouble and said that any problems should be raised with the council or his local councillor.

“That is the way to get something done about it, not shouting and using abusive language which only gets you in court.”

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