Crash driver jailed

A 24-year-old motorist who collided with a motor cyclist on the A149 near Clippesby causing him to have his foot amputated was jailed for a total of 15 months at Norwich Crown Court today.

A 24-year-old motorist who collided with a motor cyclist on the A149 near Clippesby causing him to have his foot amputated was jailed for a total of 15 months at Norwich Crown Court today.

Darren Waters, of The Glebe, Horsford, admitted dangerous driving on July 18 last year and also driving with excess alcohol, having 104 milligrams of alcohol in 100 millilitres of blood, the drink drive limit being 80.

Malcolm Robins, prosecuting, said the motorcyclist Scott Massingham is an advanced motor cyclist who rides for social and relaxation reasons. He had been visiting his family in Great Yarmouth and just before 8pm was on his way home. He travelled along the A47 and turned right at the Acle roundabout onto the A149 at a sport where there is a 50mph limit. He indicated to turn left into a slipway to Lathams. He saw a car coming towards him and after the collision the car, an Escort finished up on the other side of the road, upturned. It had approached and appeared to be out of control. The vehicle had come across into his path and collided with Mr Massingham's right leg.

Another motor cyclist behind Mr Massingham said the vehicle appeared to be out of control and was travelling well in excess of the 50mph speed limit, travelling at about 80 to 100mph.

Waters said he had been to the pub and was watching football and was on his way to Great Yarmouth to see his brother. He claimed he was going over the bridge at Potter Heigham at about 60mph. He can remember braking but said he didn't know what happened.

In an “impact statement” Mr Massingham said he was a very active man, working in the building trade and has his own company and worked 12 hours a day six days a week. He also liked to play squash and had a building extension project at home. The accident had affected him significantly and the amputation had made simple things such as making a drink in the kitchen very difficult. There were also huge emotional consequences.

Most Read

The court heard Waters, a full-time care assistant at a residential home has no previous convictions.

Ian James, defending him, said he realises the gravity of what he has done and also the “terrible consequences. He is a thoroughly nice, decent young man who has behaved inappropriately.”

He said any time in custody will weigh heavily on him.

Waters was also banned from driving for five years and must take an extended test before he can drive on the road again.

Jailing him Judge Paul Downes told him: “You have no previous offences for bad driving. Mr. Massingham was lucky to remain alive. An aggravating feature was the affect it had on the victim. The maximum sentence for dangerous driving is two years but I have to give you credit for your pleas.”