Community urged to help record as many species as possible at Train Wood, Norwich’s “incredible wildlife corridor”

Gemma Walker (right) of Norfolk Wildlife Trust with John Elliott of Friends of Train Wood and Marrio

Gemma Walker (right) of Norfolk Wildlife Trust with John Elliott of Friends of Train Wood and Marriotts Way. PIC: Supplied by Friends of Train Wood - Credit: Archant

It was destroyed by bombs in the war. But now a community group is planning to make Train Wood in Norwich the target of a different kind of blitz.

Gemma Walker of Norfolk Wildlife Trust (right) with Ursula Juta of Norfolk Rivers Trust in Train Woo

Gemma Walker of Norfolk Wildlife Trust (right) with Ursula Juta of Norfolk Rivers Trust in Train Wood. PIC: Supplied by Friends of Train Wood - Credit: Archant

The wood, near Barn Road, which was saved from sell-off by a community campaign, is to be the focus of attention by an army of citizen scientists and experts in nature and railway history later this spring.

Friends of Train Wood and Marriott's Way, the group who successfully fought to keep the site in public hands, have teamed up with Norfolk Wildlife Trust to hold a 'BioBlitz' on the site.

Supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, the event aims to record as many species possible in one day – May 27 - in the 12 acre wood, which is at the start of the Marriott's Way and next to the River Wensum.

The day will also feature railway walks at the site, which used to be Norwich's City Station, talks by the Friends of Norwich City Station as well as pond and river dipping by the Norfolk Rivers Trust. Bat walks, bird walks and tree walks.


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Lucy Galvin, Friends of Train Wood and Marriott's Way committee member, said the free event will be open to people of all ages to take part in.

'We will have experts but the main point of the event is that everyone is welcome to come along and get involved. This is citizen science on an urban site and lots of people have already volunteered to help, including some of the people who live in the wood. The last time the area was surveyed was 17 years ago so this is long overdue.'

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Gemma Walker, Living Landscape project officer at the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, said: 'I am very excited - there's a remarkable range of species in this incredible wildlife corridor. I reckon we could get up to 300 species – or maybe even more.'

John Batley of Friends of Norwich City Station said: 'There are just so many fantastic stories from the wonderful railway days here, and we are working alongside each other to share them with the public and bring the place alive.'

• The main Train Wood BioBlitz will run from 11am – 4pm on May 27, with extra walks and talks planned from dawn till dusk.

• Log onto www.trainwood.co.uk for more details about the event.

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