Children could face ‘physical injury risk’ if Hardings Way bus route in King’s Lynn is opened up to cars

A cyclist rides along Hardings Way, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop

A cyclist rides along Hardings Way, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop - Credit: Archant

Children would be at risk from plans to allow cars to use part of a bus route, according to objectors to the scheme.

Hardings Way, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop

Hardings Way, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop - Credit: Archant

Councillors are set to discuss proposals to open up part of Hardings Way, in South Lynn, to allow access to land earmarked for housing. They include three new access roads and moving an automatic bus gate.

But Lee Stevens, former head of nearby Whitefriars Primary School, is among those objecting to West Norfolk council's planning application.

'My opposition stems from the fact that at two governors' meetings with the the planning officer from Norfolk County Council, that at no stage would this road become a route for traffic other than the intended overflow use by buses,' he said. 'We were given such assurances and, on that basis, agreed to support the provision of the new roadway. The opening up of this route would not only be a flagrant reneging on the assurances the governors of the school were given, it would also represent a significant additional environmental health risk and physical injury risk to the many pupils, parents and members of

the public who walk and cycle along this safe route.'


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The Hardings Pit Community Association, which manages and urban nature reserve alongside the bus route, fears if given the go ahead, the changes would make it vulnerable to fly tipping.

Hardings Way was opened around 10 years ago, to divert buses away from London Road to help cut congestion and pollution. Plans to open part of the route are included in a development blueprint for King's Lynn's waterfront.

A bus travelling along Hardings Way, part of which could soon be open to cars. Picture: Chris BIshop

A bus travelling along Hardings Way, part of which could soon be open to cars. Picture: Chris BIshop - Credit: Archant

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County councillor Alexandra Kemp, who represents South Lynn, said: 'The King's Lynn Waterfront Plan will open up to busy traffic, Lynn's important and unique community tourism asset, Hardings Way - a bus lane, national cycle route, safe walking route to Whitefriars school, bird and wildlife haven, doorstep green, setting for heritage assets the Carmelite Arch and Friars Walk, and the traditional Green space for the local community.

'All in the mistaken belief it will relieve congestion. It will instead create a rat run on Wisbech Road and put more traffic into the heart of the medieval part of Lynn.'

West Norfolk council's planning committee meets to decide the scheme at the council's Chapel Street offices on Monday (9.30am).

Hardings Pits Doorstep Green, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop

Hardings Pits Doorstep Green, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop - Credit: Archant

Part of the Hardings Pits Doorstep Green, alongside hardings Way. Picture: Chris Bishop

Part of the Hardings Pits Doorstep Green, alongside hardings Way. Picture: Chris Bishop - Credit: Archant

Hardings Way runs through South Lynn. Picture: Chris BIshop

Hardings Way runs through South Lynn. Picture: Chris BIshop - Credit: Archant

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