Search

Burgers, blisters and Beckham

PUBLISHED: 07:20 10 June 2006 | UPDATED: 10:59 22 October 2010

It's Saturday, it's England v Paraguay on the telly, and best of all it's going to be an absolute scorcher on the weather front. So it must be time to dust off the barbecue and fill the air with the scent of rapidly charcoaling sausages, the sound of ring pulls popping on beer cans and a carousing footie tune or two.

It's Saturday, it's England v Paraguay on the telly, and best of all it's going to be an absolute scorcher on the weather front.

So it must be time to dust off the barbecue and fill the air with the scent of rapidly charcoaling sausages, the sound of ring pulls popping on beer cans and a carousing footie tune or two.

But with forecasters predicting highs of up to 26 degrees in Norwich and supermarket shelves stripped of supplies in preparation for the first chance to indulge in the World Cup party atmosphere the warnings were already starting to ring out.

Staff in the A&E department at the Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital were among the first to warn people about staying safe in the sun to avoid casualty being filled with sunburnt drunks this afternoon.

Consultant Mike Lambert said: “Football, alcohol and the heat are a heady combination. Getting sunburnt is irresponsible and is not a medical emergency. Ask for calamine lotion and paracetamol from a chemist, try to rest in a cool environment, and drink plenty of fluids but not alcohol.”

A leaflet giving simple advice about coping with hot weather is available on the hospital's website at www.nnuh.nhs.uk.

Aside from the amount of alcohol likely to be consumed there were also warnings over barbecue cooking.

Ivor Bartram, environmental health officer, said following simple guidelines would ensure everyone had a safe and enjoyable meal.

The main areas to focus on were avoiding cross-contamination between cooked and raw food, cooking everything thoroughly, even if it means a pre-cook in the microwave, and not leaving food outside in the warm for too long.

He added: “The last thing we want to do is stop people enjoying barbecues but they should be done by someone who knows what they are doing.”

The fire service issued advice to avoid injuries or damage to property.

Tips include never using petrol or paraffin to start or revive a barbecue and only using recognised fuel on cold coals, keeping a bucket of water nearby in case of emergencies, keeping children and pets well away and never leaving it unattended.

It's fire safety message could be particularly pertinent today - enjoy yourself, but remember too much alcohol and fire never mix!


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Eastern Daily Press. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Eastern Daily Press