Brave Thorpe-St-Andrew primary school pupil given all clear after three-year battle with cancer

Archie Grimmer, seven, happy to be using the telescope given to him by astronomer Mark Thompson when

Archie Grimmer, seven, happy to be using the telescope given to him by astronomer Mark Thompson when he was first was diagnosed with cancer three years ago, now that he has had his last course of chemotherapy. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2016

Playing with his toys and laughing with his friends, seven-year-old Archie Grimmer looks like any other happy child.

Archie Grimmer, seven, happy he has had his last course of chemotherapy after a three-year battle wi

Archie Grimmer, seven, happy he has had his last course of chemotherapy after a three-year battle with cancer, with mum Lindsey George, dad Luke Grimmer, and baby brother eight-weeks-old Arthur Grimmer. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2016

But just three years ago, his life was turned upside down after a tumour was found on his lung while on holiday with his parents in America.

The Hillside Avenue Primary School pupil, from Thorpe St Andrew, was diagnosed with a rare form of blood cancer and required urgent treatment.

Over the following eight months he had to endure intensive chemotherapy, which left him unable to walk and caused him to suffer 'horrible' nightmares.

But Archie is today on the road to recovery and is smiling once again after completing his final course of chemotherapy.


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Mum Lindsey George said: 'Looking back at it, it's amazing in terms of how well he has done and how far he has come. We are so proud of him.

'He has just taken it all in his stride. I think adults think about it more, but children are so resilient and he just got on with it.'

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The 31-year-old said the family had been on holiday in Orlando, Florida, when Archie's condition began to worsen following a cough.

He was taken to see a doctor at a walk-in clinic and was found to have low oxygen levels, initially thought to be from pneumonia.

But a subsequent X-ray revealed he had a suffered a collapsed lung caused by a tumour and was immediately transferred to a children's hospital.

'I was devastated,' Miss George said. 'When we got to the Arnold Palmer Hospital they inflated his lung pretty quickly and did a CT scan.

'But when they showed us the results, I just fainted. It was awful.'

Archie, who was just three at the time, was diagnosed with T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma.

And after being flown back to the UK, he underwent eight months of intensive chemotherapy at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge.

During that time, Miss George said he was temporarily unable to walk and suffered nightmares due to the high dosage of steroids.

'He was terrified as to what was going on and it's hard to explain it all to a three-year-old,' Miss George said.

'Through the intensive stages he would have sickness, but the hardest thing was when he could not walk and that was quite upsetting.'

Archie has since been on 'maintenance chemotherapy' for the past three years, and has had to endure weekly blood tests.

But after his cancer went into complete remission, Miss George said Archie completed his last course of chemotherapy on September 16.

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