Black and white televisions still a hit in Norfolk

Richard Howard from Cawston who still regularly watches on a black and white TV and even has the ori

Richard Howard from Cawston who still regularly watches on a black and white TV and even has the original purchase receipt and Broadcast Receiving Licenses. PHOTO BY SIMON FINLAY - Credit: SIMON FINLAY

Forget iPlayer, HDTV and Netflix, it seems dozens of us are still watching television in rather more rudimentary form.

Richard Howard from Cawston who still regularly watches on a black and white TV and even has the ori

Richard Howard from Cawston who still regularly watches on a black and white TV and even has the original purchase receipt and Broadcast Receiving Licenses. PHOTO BY SIMON FINLAY - Credit: SIMON FINLAY

New figures have revealed the numbers of black and white TV licenses being issued in our region.

The data, from TV licensing, shows that, almost half a century since colour television was introduced to the UK, there are still more than 50 people in Norfolk with a monochrome set. These include 30 people in the Norwich area, 12 in King's Lynn and 10 in Great Yarmouth.

Among those still clinging to a black and white set is Richard Howard, from Cawston, who has kept his Bush TUG58 ever since his father purchased it for £113 on September 4 1957.

'As you get older you appreciate the things from your youth,' he said. 'I started to collect TV programmes from the 50s and 60s that I remember watching, and I found it was nice to watch them on the original TV.

'From 1957 to 1976 I watched nothing but black and white TV and I just find it a very restful way of watching it. I often go in at lunchtime to watch the news on it.'

Black and white licences cost just £49 compared to their colour counterparts at £145.50 per year. Despite the switchover to digital transmissions and an increase in the use of HD televisions, there are still 9,356 black and white licences in force across the UK.

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Mr Howard, from Aylsham Road, had his set fitted with a special box around eight years ago to allow him watch digital programmes and DVDs. And although he also has a colour TV and appropriate licence, he said he had considered making a permanent switch back to monochrome.

'I have thought many times about chucking out my colour sets and to just buy a black and white TV licence,' he added.

'I would rather watch the toddle they show on TV in black and white, than in colour.'

Do you watch television on a set older than Mr Howard's? Call Luke Powell on 01603 772684