BBC's Winterwatch coming to Wild Ken Hill at end of the month

Winterwatch is set to return to BBC Two on January 18.

Winterwatch is set to return to BBC Two on January 18. - Credit: BBC

The BBC will return to Norfolk this month with presenters Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan visiting Wild Ken Hill near King's Lynn for Winterwatch.

Live cameras will be set up at the nature reserve for two weeks from January 18, with the BBC's Natural History Unit capturing all the action at the marshland.

Presenters will explore all aspect of the native wildlife in winter including comparing the UK's mustelid populations as well as checking in with the stoats, weasels, pine martens and a group of polecats found just down the coast from Wild Ken Hill.

BBC Two's Winterwatch will be visiting Wild Ken Hill at the end of the month.

BBC Two's Winterwatch will be visiting Wild Ken Hill at the end of the month. - Credit: BBC

Mr Packham will be visiting a long-eared owl roost to see the UK’s rarest owl species, while Ms Strachan will be exploring the wildlife that survives inside trees during Winter.

Together the pair will be discussing the controversial subject of what garden birds should be fed throughout the winter season and beyond.

Chris Packham and his Autmnwatch team have returned to Wild Ken Hill in Heacham. Picture: Sarah Luc

Winterwatch presenter Chris Packham. - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

The series will also relaunch its Winter Watchlist of species to look out for during the winter period with some easy to spot and others far more tricky.

A horse at Wild Ken Hill near King's Lynn.

A horse at Wild Ken Hill near King's Lynn. - Credit: BBC

It will feature a wide range of creatures that live in a wide range of habitats from rural to urban locations.

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Live cameras in Norfolk will be streaming across the BBC's digital platforms as well as being shown on the live programme on BBC Two.

Michaela Strachan and Chris Packham and their Autmnwatch team have returned to Wild Ken Hill in Heac

Winterwatch presenter Michaela Strachan. - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

A fixed-rig camera will be trained on the grazing marsh to witness the huge array of wading birds that feed there including widgeon, teal, curlew, oystercatchers and pink footed geese.

Wild Ken Hill which will be visited by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan for Winterwatch.

Wild Ken Hill which will be visited by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan for Winterwatch. - Credit: BBC

Another camera will be located in the beaver enclosure with plans to place another one in the conservation area's lodge.

Michaela Strachan and Chris Packham and their Autmnwatch team have returned to Wild Ken Hill in Heac

Winterwatch presenters Michaela Strachan and Chris Packham. - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

On the river a camera will look at otters, goshawks and herons and there will also be a number of winter experiments carried out to understand the feeding habits of the birds living in west Norfolk.

Cows on the marshland at Wild Ken Hill.

Cows on the marshland at Wild Ken Hill. - Credit: BBC

The team will also put a deer carcass out to see how the animals who visit it differ from those visiting one located on the Isle of Mull in Scotland.

A bird feeder will be put out to feed blue tits, great tits, coal tits, nuthatches, jays, chaffinch, greenfinch and robins.

An owl perches on some wire at Wild Ken Hill. 

An owl perches on some wire at Wild Ken Hill. - Credit: BBC

The first episode of Winterwatch will air on Tuesday, January 18, on BBC Two.

Birds in the snow at Wild Ken Hill.

Birds in the snow at Wild Ken Hill. - Credit: BBC

A Winter scene at Wild Ken Hill which will be home to Winterwatch.

A Winter scene at Wild Ken Hill which will be home to Winterwatch. - Credit: BBC



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