Are these the remains of the legendary beast known as Black Shuck?

This rather large dog skeleton was uncovered in the south of the Leiston Abbey dig site.

This rather large dog skeleton was uncovered in the south of the Leiston Abbey dig site. - Credit: Archant

Could this be the final resting place of Suffolk's hell-hound, Black Shuck?

Legend has it that a fiery-eyed dog-like creature once roamed the region's coastline.

Legend has it that a fiery-eyed dog-like creature once roamed the region's coastline. - Credit: Eastern Counties Newspapers

Since the middle-ages, legend has spread of a fearful beast once said to stalk the region's countryside and coastline. Despite tales of a fiery-eyed monster showing up in graveyards, forests and roadsides – and an account of claw marks appearing on the door of Blythburgh Church – the giant dog's existence has been reserved to the annals of folklore.

Archaeologists from DigVentures working at Leiston Abbey last year.

Archaeologists from DigVentures working at Leiston Abbey last year. - Credit: Archant

Until now, perhaps, as archeologists have revealed evidence of huge skeletal remains unearthed by a member of the public in the trenches at Leiston Abbey last year.

Claw marks on the door of Blythburgh Church were said to be Black Shuck's.

Claw marks on the door of Blythburgh Church were said to be Black Shuck's. - Credit: Sarah Lucy brown

The DigVentures team are set to return to the site this summer, and are again inviting amateur history hunters to take their place alongside the experts from July 8-20, with the prospect of coming across an equally exciting discovery.

DigVentures' camp at the abbey.

DigVentures' camp at the abbey. - Credit: Archant

Of course, the giant carcass is more likely to be what remains of someone's beloved canine companion, and is currently being analysed to find out how long it was buried in the grounds of monastic ruins.


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The site was left almost untouched until last year, when site managers, and chamber music academy, Pro Corda teamed up with DigVentures to run only the second 'crowdfunded' community project of its kind.

DigVentures managing director Lisa Westcott Wilkins said: 'We're still waiting for results from specialists but we believe the bones are from when the abbey was active – so they could be medieval.

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'The dog is huge – about the size of a Great Dane – and was found near where the abbey's kitchen would have been. It was quite a surprise. We're all dog lovers and we have a site dog with us on our digs, so it was quite poignant. Even back then, pets were held in high regard.'

It is hoped the skeleton will be exhibited as part of this year's dig, which has received financial backing from the Heritage Lottery Fund to allow organisers to replace paper context sheets with a digital recording system, tailored to meet the needs of a worldwide community archaeology team.

Mrs Westcott Wilkins, whose team includes former Time Team archaeologist Raksha Dave, said: 'There is evidence of a prehistoric age at the abbey, which even English Heritage had been unaware of. We're really looking forward to going back. This year we can involve the public much more. They can get immediate online access.'

Has Black Shuck crossed your path? Email newsdesk@archant.co.uk

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