10 album covers related to Norfolk

Power, Corruption and Lies record sleeve

The cover of Power, Corruption & Lies by New Order. Designed by Peter Saville. - Credit: Archant

From David Bowie to the Singing Postman, Norfolk and the surrounding area has played a part in some of music's most iconic album covers. Here are just some of them.

New Order - Power, Corruption and Lies

Power, Corruption and Lies record sleeve

The cover of Power, Corruption & Lies by New Order. Designed by Peter Saville. - Credit: Archant

The photo used by Peter Saville for this iconic cover came from a postcard he purchased of a painting by Henri Fantin-Latour, from the shop at Norwich Castle Museum.

He faced a long legal dispute over use of the picture, which eventually saw Factory Records boss Tony Wilson, telling Sir Michael Levey, then director of the National Gallery, to allow the band to use the image as it was publicly owned. 

Pink Floyd - Division Bell

Fields in Queen Adelade with Ely cathedral in the background, where the cover for Pink Floyd's The D

Fields in Queen Adelade with Ely cathedral in the background, where the cover for Pink Floyd's The Division Bell album. Photo: Casey Cooper-Fiske - Credit: Archant

Taken from the village of Queen Adelaide near Ely, this image was set up by Pink Floyd collaborator Storm Thorgerson who placed two large metal heads, each the size of double-decker buses, on either side of the cathedral.


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These faces are intended to be viewed in two ways, two faces talking to each other or one single face made up by the two statues, the second interpretation is said to be a reference to the late Syd Barrett.

The two heads have since been displayed in exhibitions across the world, most recently in an exhibition of the band's work at London's Victoria and Albert Museum.

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The Rolling Stones - Let It Bleed

New member Mick Taylor (second from right) joins the Rolling Stones to replace lead guitarist Brian

Mick Taylor (second from right) joined the Rolling Stones in 1969 to replace Brian Jones. - Credit: PA

Norwich City owner and Norfolk resident, Delia Smith, had a big hand in this legendary album cover making the cake photographed along with candles depicting each of the Stones.

Her brief was to make the cake "really gaudy" and as a thank you Mick Jagger sent her a signed album cover, which Delia still owns to this day.

The Stranglers - Norfolk Coast

Rock Group the Stranglers on Hunstanton Beach, in front of the candy coloured cliffs, during a photo

Rock Group the Stranglers on Hunstanton Beach, in front of the candy coloured cliffs, during a photo shoot for their new album, by American Music photographer Harrison Funk (front kneeling).City: Hunstanton, NorfolkPhoto: Matthew UsherCopy: Laura DevlinFor: EDP EDP pics © 2003 Tel: (01603) 772434 - Credit: Eastern Daily Press, Archant

The EDP was on shoot when The Stranglers visited Hunstanton to create the cover for their aptly named Norfolk Coast album.

Due to heavy editing it's hard to notice the Norfolk coastline on the album cover, with a night-time background and lightening replacing a reasonably sunny scene by the seaside.

The Streets - Computers and Blues

Student accomodation at the UEA where The Streets' Computers and Blues album cover was shot. Photo:

Student accomodation at the UEA where The Streets' Computers and Blues album cover was shot. Photo: Casey Cooper-Fiske - Credit: Archant

The Streets headed to the UEA in 2009 for the cover of their Computers and Blues album, the cover image is of the university's Norfolk Terrace halls of residence which were designed by architect Sir Denys Lasdun.

The buildings were named as 'one of the most outstanding new university designs in Britain' when they were first built and earned the eighth spot in the top 10 of best UK university architecture by the Architect's Journal.

Welcome to Norwich (compilation)

The 'Welcome to Norwich a Fine City' sign at the Bowthorpe. Dereham road roundabout. Picture: Denise

The 'Welcome to Norwich a Fine City' sign at the Bowthorpe. Dereham road roundabout. Picture: Denise Bradley - Credit: copyright: Archant 2013

In the 80s Norwich's music scene was booming, with post-punk bands such as Screen 3, the Higsons and the Mohair Twins, who attracted the eyes of the nation on the cult Welcome to Norwich compilation.

The cover is a picture of one of the iconic signs welcoming visitors to the city, and is thought to be the one on Mile Cross Lane.

Killing Joke - What's THIS For...!

Colegate as seen on the cover of Killing Joke's What’s THIS For...! album. Photo: Casey Cooper-Fiske

Colegate as seen on the cover of Killing Joke's What’s THIS For...! album. Photo: Casey Cooper-Fiske - Credit: Archant

Not many people know the cover for Killing Joke's second LP was taken at 88 Colegate in Norwich, editing and illustration means that only the left side of the image can be identified as Norwich.

Work on houses in the area means that the buildings now look slightly different to the album cover, although the outline still remains.

The Singing Postman - The Best of the Singing Postman

The real thing - Singing Postman Allan Smethurst.

The real thing - Singing Postman Allan Smethurst. - Credit: Archant

The cover of this collection of the Singing Postman's finest Norfolk ditties is rumoured to have been shot in Sheringham, where he moved to at the age of 11 and worked for the post office.

At the peak of his fame the Singing Postman outsold the Beatles and the Rolling Stones in Norfolk's record shops.

David Bowie - Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars/Hunky Dory

David Bowie Ziggy Stardust.

David Bowie Ziggy Stardust. - Credit: PA Archive/Press Association Ima

Both album covers were designed by Norfolk artist Terry Pastor, who illustrated photographs of David Bowie to create the iconic covers as we know them today.

If that wasn't enough of a Norfolk link, Hunky Dory's 'Life On Mars' name checks the Norfolk Broads.


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