10,000 fish released into Norfolk river

The Environment Agency fisheries team release 10,000 dace into the River Thet. Picture: Environment

The Environment Agency fisheries team release 10,000 dace into the River Thet. Picture: Environment Agency - Credit: Archant

Ten thousand fish have been released into a Norfolk river six months early following the recent heatwave.

The Environment Agency fisheries team release 10,000 dace into the River Thet. Picture: Environment

The Environment Agency fisheries team release 10,000 dace into the River Thet. Picture: Environment Agency - Credit: Archant

Fisheries officers from the Environment Agency released thousands of young dace into the River Thet, near Thetford, after a large batch spawned at Calverton fish farm.

The sheer number of fish that spawned due to the recent hot weather meant the farm was at full capacity, resulting in the fish being released at 18 months old - six months earlier than usual.

Kye Jerrom, Environment Agency fisheries specialist in East Anglia, said: “Restocking our rivers helps boost fish populations, support a healthy ecology, and benefits anglers – and it’s a key feature of the work we do to benefit people and the environment.

“This work is part of a whole programme of fish-restocking, which will see thousands of dace, roach and chub put back into the river to compensate for the fish lost to a pollution in 2018.”

The Environment Agency fisheries team release 10,000 dace into the River Thet. Picture: Environment

The Environment Agency fisheries team release 10,000 dace into the River Thet. Picture: Environment Agency - Credit: Archant


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Dace are a small silvery fish that can live between six to 12 years.

The small fish tend to shoal in huge numbers and feed on the river bed, but will come to the surface to catch flies and midges.

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The officers were able to complete the task in a few hours.

The release of the fish is part of an ongoing project to restock waters following a pollution incident in 2018.

The Environment Agency plans further restocking in the winter.

In addition to monitoring and improving fish numbers, the agency’s fisheries teams also help fish in distress, carry out fisheries enforcement activity, respond to environmental incidents, improve habitat and encourage new anglers to take up the hobby, working alongside angling clubs, wildlife trusts, landowners and other groups.

The Environment Agency’s fisheries team work is funded by income from fishing licence sales.

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