Norfolk wartime home of Sir Michael Caine is up for sale

Flashback to 2003 - A delighted Sir Michael Caine with the Blue Plaque he unveiled outside the schoo

Flashback to 2003 - A delighted Sir Michael Caine with the Blue Plaque he unveiled outside the school he attended as a wartime evacuee in North Runcton. Photo: John Hocknell - Credit: Eastern Daily Press, Archant

Sir Michael Caine looks back fondly on his time as a child evacuee during the Second World War in west Norfolk.

Michael Caine's former home in North Runcton. Photo: Belton Duffey agents

Michael Caine's former home in North Runcton. Photo: Belton Duffey agents - Credit: Archant

And now property hunters with some extra cash can enjoy the sights, sounds and country air that he once experienced.

His former home in North Runcton, near King's Lynn, is up for sale, with a guide price of £400,000.

The renovated former schoolhouse overlooks the village green and church, and dates back to about 1900.

And it was there, as a seven-year-old – then known as Maurice Micklewhite – that the 83-year-old Oscar-winning actor lived after he left bomb-threatened south London with his mother, Ellen, and brother, Stanley.

Michael Caine's former home in North Runcton. Photo: Belton Duffey

Michael Caine's former home in North Runcton. Photo: Belton Duffey - Credit: Archant


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A spokesman for estate agents, Belton Duffey said:: 'Sir Michael Caine resided at this property when at the age of seven he was evacuated to North Runcton to escape the Blitz.

'He made his first stage appearances at the adjoining village school.'

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The star of more than 100 films spent several years in North Runcton and has described his years in Norfolk as 'the happiest time of my life'.

In 2003, he returned to North Runcton and was present when a commemorative Blue Plaque was placed in the village.

He also visited his former school and his old home, and told an audience of villagers and local dignitaries of the 'genuine affection' he had for North Runcton.

He also acknowledged how his headmistress Miss Linton encouraged him to do well and sparked his love of books.

His stage debut was as a 10 year old in the annual village pantomime – playing Baron Fitznoodle, the father of the Ugly Sisters – in Cinderella.

The laughs he got in response were what spurred him on to pursue a career in acting, he said, although he admitted he was a 'terrible actor' at the time.

As a wartime evacuee, he made friends with children in the village who taught him about pheasants, foxes and farming.

He wrote in his autobiography of the sharp contrast with his life in south London: 'Here was a chance to run free in fresh air, away from soot- laden fumes and get the sun on my face instead of the shade of the dark buildings.

'For children like myself the war was lucky. We were taken out of our rotten environment and given a chance for a healthy life.'

Sir Michael's mother worked as a cook for the English family at The Grange, North Runcton, and he and his family later moved into the servants' quarters there.

He credits the healthy diet he enjoyed while in the region as a factor for keeping him so healthy.

He told a national newspaper that he ate hardly any sugar, which helped him build up a strong immune system.

'In the Second World War in England for six years we lived entirely off organic foods. There were no chemicals to put into the land because they were all used in explosives,' he said.

The property for sale is freehold with viewing strictly by appointment with the agent. Call 01553 770055 or email info@beltonduffey.com

Do you remember Sir Michael in North Runcton during the war? Email david.bale2@archant.co.uk

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