Nine things readers told us they missed about Norwich in the 90s

Norwich in the 90s: Peppermint Park, Kulture Shock and St Stephens Street. (L-R)

Norwich in the 90s: Peppermint Park, Kulture Shock and St Stephens Street. (L-R) - Credit: Archant

On Monday we looked at 14 things you could do in Norwich in the 90s which you can't do anymore. The article brought back lots of memories from our readers and here are some of the best suggestions of other things you can't do in Norwich today:

GARY MOXON THE OWNER OF THE STAR WARS EMPORIUM ON LOWER GOAT LANE (RIGHT) AND IAN KETTLE WITH TOY LI

GARY MOXON THE OWNER OF THE STAR WARS EMPORIUM ON LOWER GOAT LANE (RIGHT) AND IAN KETTLE WITH TOY LIGHTSABERS FROM THE FILM THE PHANTOM MENANCE. Photo: Liz Reynolds - Credit: Eastern Counties Newspapers

• Dancing the night away at nightclubs such as Ritzy's and Fifth Avenue in Tombland or Peppermint Park nightclub on Rose Lane

Reader Lyndsey Chapman especially misses these two Norwich nightclubs and fondly recalls great nights spent going from Ritzy's to Fifth Avenue.

Peppermint Park staff celebrate the change-over from Henry'sstaff pic taken 18 Jan 1991

Peppermint Park staff celebrate the change-over from Henry'sstaff pic taken 18 Jan 1991

• Buying games from One Step Beyond, a computer store that used to be based on Bedford Street

ONE STEP BEYOND IN NORWICH. Photo: Sonya Brown

ONE STEP BEYOND IN NORWICH. Photo: Sonya Brown


You may also want to watch:


Whiley Boy particularly misses visiting One Step Beyond on a regular basis and also Volume 1 bookshop.

• Visiting the Central Library, which closed in 1994 following a terrible fire

Norwich central library forecourt Aug 1990

Norwich central library forecourt Aug 1990 - Credit: Archant

Most Read

Scalexkid misses the central library as well as being able to smoke in a pub.

• Getting a fry up and pot of tea at Number 10 coffee bar on Thorpe Road

Number Ten coffee bar, Thorpe Road, Norwich

Number Ten coffee bar, Thorpe Road, Norwich - Credit: Archant

Rob thought Number 10 cafe was the place to be. I wonder whether the fry up inspector would agree?

• Driving down St Stephens Street and back again and driving two-way along Magdalen Street

St Stephens Street, August 1997.

St Stephens Street, August 1997.

Dee misses being able to drive in certain places of the city, such as St Stephens Street. Others have also said they missed car parking in the 90s as it was much easier and cheaper than today.

• Grabbing a burger from Burger King on Rampant Horse Street, browsing in Kulture Shock in St Benedicts Street and visiting The Star Wars Emporium

Kulture Shock on St Benedicts Street, Norwich. Picture: James Bass

Kulture Shock on St Benedicts Street, Norwich. Picture: James Bass - Credit: Evening News © 2006

These are the things Seb Anstey misses most about Norwich in the 90s. Kulture Shock started in Norwich in 1997 selling science fiction, crime and horror books as well as Doctor Who merchandise. The shop eventually moved to Beccles in 2007, but does still have an online store. As for The Star Wars Emporium, the specialist shop on Lower Goat Lane sold models and other collectables in the 90s. The location is now home to The Egg hair salon.

NORWICH MARKET. Photo: Paul Hewitt

NORWICH MARKET. Photo: Paul Hewitt - Credit: Eastern Counties Newspapers

• Shopping at the old market, back when it had wooden stalls and striped multicoloured canvas coverings.

Nick Walker thinks the loss of the old wooden market stalls is a huge shame and took away some of the market's original charm and character.

• Eating pick 'n' mix from Woolworths

Tenchman7 misses the moorish pick 'n' mix from Woolworths. Who didn't love a good jelly egg?

• Ordering an 'Only for the brave' from Pizza One Pancakes Too

Resident Smith misses this dish as well as ToGo's BLT and egg and bacon sandwiches.

• You can share your memories of Norwich in the 90s in the comments below.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus