Reader Letter: Is nature changing before our eyes?

Bumble bees: There are many species of this type of bee to be found in Norfolk. Picture: Ben Mutton/

Bumble bees: There are many species of this type of bee to be found in Norfolk. Picture: Ben Mutton/citizenside.com - Credit: citizenside.com

One of our readers wonders whether nature is changing before our eyes. What do you think?

Antirrhinums or snapdragons, as they are called, grew in profusion in my childhood garden. We kept bees so it was fascinating to watch the bees making a 'beeline' for the flowers.

They were agile at resting on the bottom 'lip' of the flower depressing it to obtain the nectar inside. Bees are attracted to bright colours especially yellow.

Scientists in a survey recently in the mountain valley in the Pyrenees have discovered changes in the colouration of snapdragons, noticing especially an increase in yellow. They suggest this might be due to the increased need to attract bees.

Maybe changes in the bee population or even climate changes might be the reason the plants need to be more attractive to bees and because of the competition from other species.


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Maybe we underestimate the ability of nature to adapt to conditions.

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It would be interesting to hear of any further scientific discovery on 'flower colouring'.

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