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Seven of the quirkiest places to stay in Norfolk

PUBLISHED: 16:02 20 July 2016 | UPDATED: 08:44 21 July 2016

Quirky places to stay in Norfolk: Appleton Water Tower, St Michael the Arhcangel's Church and Cley Windmill. (L-R)

Quirky places to stay in Norfolk: Appleton Water Tower, St Michael the Arhcangel's Church and Cley Windmill. (L-R)

Archant

Looking to get away this summer? Here's a look at some of the most unique and unusual places across the county where you can stay.

Appleton Water Tower, Sandringham. Photo: Landmark TrustAppleton Water Tower, Sandringham. Photo: Landmark Trust

• Appleton Water Tower, Sandringham

Live like royalty at Appleton Water Tower, a Landmark Trust property located on the edge of the Sandringham Estate. The 60-foot Victorian tower was constructed in 1877 to supply clean water after the Prince of Wales, King Edward VII, and his eldest son fell ill with typhoid. Today the structure has been converted into a retreat, where up to four people are able to stay. Appleton consists of one twin and one double room, one bathroom, living room, kitchen and boasts stunning views over the surrounding area from the terrace. The place is dog friendly and for a four night stay prices start from £500.

Appleton Water Tower, Sandringham. Photo: Landmark TrustAppleton Water Tower, Sandringham. Photo: Landmark Trust

• Cromer Lodge, Felbrigg Estate

This quirky one-bedroom cottage used to be part of Felbrigg Hall’s former Gate Lodge. Today the cosy property is available for a minimum stay of two nights, with prices until the end of August starting from £517. Guests at the lodge will have access to the park and woodland walks through the Estate out of hours, as well as their own private garden to the side of the cottage. Cromer Lodge consists of one double bedroom and bathroom, kitchen/dining area and sitting room with bay window and open fire.

Cromer Lodge. Photo: National TrustCromer Lodge. Photo: National Trust

• The Tower, Blickling Hall Estate

Situated on the picturesque Blickling Estate, (a 15 minute walk from Blickling Hall), The Tower, a ‘mini castle’, is complete with a Rapunzel tower and rooftop terrace offering spectacular views across woodland, rolling fields and Blickling lake. The Tower also boasts two double bedrooms, a kitchen, two bathrooms, sitting/dining room, spiral staircase and outdoor seating. Up to four people can stay at the property, however dogs are not allowed, and prices until the end of August range from £1,019 for three nights to £1,599 for seven.

The Tower. Photo: National TrustThe Tower. Photo: National Trust

• Mustard Pot Cottage, Felbrigg Estate

The unique Mustard Pot Cottage on the Felbrigg Estate sleeps up to four people and features an octagonal shaped sitting room and bedroom, modern appliances, conservatory, second bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, utility room and dining room. The property also offers a large fenced garden and guests have direct access to acres of park and woodland on the estate. From July 6 to August 30 prices start from £770 for a three night stay.

Mustard Pot Cottage. Photo: National TrustMustard Pot Cottage. Photo: National Trust

• Bagthorpe Treehouse, Bagthorpe Hall

A short stroll through the grounds of Bagthorpe Hall will take you to Bagthorpe Treehouse, a creation inspired by owners Gina and Tid’s love of safaris in Africa. The treehouse, situated under a Holm oak tree, offers complete privacy and contains a king-size four poster bed, two single bunk beds, kitchen basics, copper bath with shower and a verandah on which to sit and admire the surroundings. A stay here will set you back roughly £215 per night.

• St Michael the Archangel’s Church, Booton

Champing (church camping) is a new trend cropping up across the country thanks to The Churches Conservation Trust, whereby people spend a night in ancient churches and enjoy a cooked breakfast the next day. One of the churches currently available for Champing is St Michael the Archangel’s in the village of Booton. The building was built in the later part of the 19th Century and was designed by Rev Whitwell Elwin, the rector of the church from 1849 to 1900 and a descendant of John Rolfe and Pocahontas. The cost of Champing is currently £55 per adult.

Camping inside St Michael and All Angels Church, Booton. Picture: JOSEPH CASEYCamping inside St Michael and All Angels Church, Booton. Picture: JOSEPH CASEY

• Cley Windmill, Cley-next-the-Sea

Built in the early 19th Century, this well-known landmark on the North Norfolk Coast which has been converted into a bed and breakfast offers idyllic views of the reeds, marshes and the River Glaven. The windmill can sleep up to 12 guests in six rooms and a further eight can stay in the Boat House, Long House and Dovecote, all of which consist of original features, en-suite bathrooms, flat-screen televisions, DVD players and complimentary WiFi. Prices at Cley Windmill on a Sunday to Thursday start from £179 per night between May and October, including school holidays. Friday and Saturday prices are a little higher, costing £199 per night and both nights must be booked together.

Cley windmill at dusk. Picture: Matthew Usher.Cley windmill at dusk. Picture: Matthew Usher.

• Where’s the quirkiest place you’ve ever stayed in Norfolk? Let us know in the comments below.

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