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New Norwich delivery company gives 100pc of food bill to restaurants

PUBLISHED: 06:00 04 September 2020 | UPDATED: 11:20 04 September 2020

Norwich Urban Collective has been set up to make it fairer for restaurants with 100pc of the food bill going to them and the only charge is the delivery fee which goes to rider. Maryanne Moles, Adam Burt, Joel Rial and Samantha Woodhouse (L-R) Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Norwich Urban Collective has been set up to make it fairer for restaurants with 100pc of the food bill going to them and the only charge is the delivery fee which goes to rider. Maryanne Moles, Adam Burt, Joel Rial and Samantha Woodhouse (L-R) Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Archant

A new delivery service has been set-up to rival the likes of Deliveroo and Uber Eats in the city.

Norwich Urban Collective has already signed up four independents in the city, including Grosvenor Fish Bar. Pictured is Maryanne Moles picking up an order. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANNorwich Urban Collective has already signed up four independents in the city, including Grosvenor Fish Bar. Pictured is Maryanne Moles picking up an order. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Norwich Urban Collective was launched in May by couple Samantha Woodhouse and Maryanne Moles with friends Adam Burt and Joel Rial, who all previously worked for national delivery companies.

After seeing other companies taking up to 30pc of the total bill, they felt that they could “do it better” and lockdown gave them the push they needed to go it alone.

Their first partner was Grosvenor Fish Bar, in the Norwich Lanes, which reopened for takeaways in May using another delivery platform.

READ MORE: Footballer and takeaway owner’s new street food stall goes from ‘strength to strength’

Norwich Urban Collective partners Maryanne Moles, Adam Burt, Joel Rial and Samantha Woodhouse (L-R) Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANNorwich Urban Collective partners Maryanne Moles, Adam Burt, Joel Rial and Samantha Woodhouse (L-R) Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

They organised a meeting with owners Duane Dibartolomeo and Christian Motta who loved what they were doing and now Grosvenor Fish Bar solely uses Norwich Urban Collective riders.

Over the last four months, Norwich Urban Collective has delivered over 2,000 orders for the popular chippy and three more places have now signed up, which are Japanese restaurant Shiki, Moorish Falafel Bar and Sweet Treats, based outside Debenhams.

All of them receive 100pc of the food bill when customers order and the whole £5 delivery charge goes to the driver.

Miss Woodhouse, 37, said: “We were already working for some delivery companies, which I had done for four years, and we thought that we could do it better.

The Norwich Urban Collective delivery service has been set up to make it fairer for restaurants, pictured is partner Maryanne Moles Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANThe Norwich Urban Collective delivery service has been set up to make it fairer for restaurants, pictured is partner Maryanne Moles Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

READ MORE: Norwich street food market raises £10,000 to feed homeless

“It started four months ago when I contacted Grosvenor and saw they were going on another delivery platform so we had a very brief, socially-distanced meeting and the guys loved what we were doing and it went from there.

“We are trying to help independents rather than branches and franchises and we take nothing from the restaurants or drivers.”

The Norwich Urban Collective is currently based in the side room upstairs at Grosvenor Fish Bar, as Mr Dibartolomeo and Mr Motta have let them use it while they aren’t doing eat-in, and they are looking to expand and to hire more drivers.

Miss Woodhouse added: “People are loving it and every single day we are getting more messages.”

Order at norwichurbancollective.co.uk


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