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PUBLISHED: 10:25 15 October 2019 | UPDATED: 10:52 15 October 2019

A 70,000 square feet temporary artwork named 'Estate' by artist Richard Woods was installed in the grounds of Houghton Hall in Norfolk. Picture: Norwich University of the Arts

A 70,000 square feet temporary artwork named 'Estate' by artist Richard Woods was installed in the grounds of Houghton Hall in Norfolk. Picture: Norwich University of the Arts

Archant

A gigantic drawing of a house was laid out in the grounds of one of Norfolk's grandest homes in a 'barn-raising' art project.

Artist Richard Woods and Lord Cholmondeley in front of Estate at Houghton Hall. Picture: Peter HugginsArtist Richard Woods and Lord Cholmondeley in front of Estate at Houghton Hall. Picture: Peter Huggins

Forty-one students from the Norwich University of the Arts (NUA) helped to install the 70,000 sq feet drawing called 'Estate' at Houghton Hall over a couple of hours.

Estate was designed by artist Richard Woods and consists of black cotton fabric secured with lightweight tent pegs.

Mr Woods, who is based in London, said it was a 'performative work' which blurred the borders between art, design and architecture.

He said the artwork contrasted starkly with Houghton Hall itself, a country house built in the Palladian architectural style in the 1720s for Great Britain's first prime minister, Sir Robert Walpole.

A 70,000 square feet temporary artwork named 'Estate' by artist Richard Woods was installed in the grounds of Houghton Hall in Norfolk. Picture: Norwich University of the ArtsA 70,000 square feet temporary artwork named 'Estate' by artist Richard Woods was installed in the grounds of Houghton Hall in Norfolk. Picture: Norwich University of the Arts

Mr Woods said: "Estate is a conversation between two architectural styles.

"The simplistic cartoon graphic of Estate with the Palladian grandeur of Walpole's original.

"One that has taken a couple of hours to complete and one that has taken many generations."

Estate was taken down late on Sunday after being on display for just one day.

A 70,000 square feet temporary artwork named 'Estate' by artist Richard Woods was installed in the grounds of Houghton Hall in Norfolk. Picture: Norwich University of the ArtsA 70,000 square feet temporary artwork named 'Estate' by artist Richard Woods was installed in the grounds of Houghton Hall in Norfolk. Picture: Norwich University of the Arts

The work, which was the size of a football pitch, was inspired by a trip to the Uffington Horse in Oxfordshire and is designed to be seen from above.

Professor Neil Powell, NUA's pro vice-chancellor, said: "Assisting Richard Woods with the installation at Houghton is a unique opportunity for undergraduate and postgraduate students from a wide range of NUA's arts and media course to understand the creative direction and mechanics of installing a major artwork at such a historic location.

"The students will also be documenting the installation through photography and film. We're grateful to both Lord Cholmondeley and the artist for the opportunity."

Lord David Cholmondeley, of Houghton Hall, said; "I met Richard at an art event in Cheshire and he asked me if he could install it here. We had a timing issue because of the Henry Moore show which has only just been de-installed but it is wonderful to have a work like this here."

A 70,000 square feet temporary artwork named 'Estate' by artist Richard Woods was installed in the grounds of Houghton Hall in Norfolk. Picture: Norwich University of the ArtsA 70,000 square feet temporary artwork named 'Estate' by artist Richard Woods was installed in the grounds of Houghton Hall in Norfolk. Picture: Norwich University of the Arts

Having installed the drawing at The Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Mr Woods wanted to place the work next to a large and grand example of period architecture.

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