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Reader letter: Who said Norfolk should be Nelson’s County?

PUBLISHED: 14:18 29 July 2018 | UPDATED: 14:27 29 July 2018

The Royal Navy Museum's official portrait of Admiral Lord Nelson which is considered to be the best likeness of the great man and is typical in it's view of him from his left side. Britain's most famous sailor favoured this view perhaps because his most visible battle wounds were to his right. Nelson died at the of the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 after being injured several times in previous conflicts. He lost the sight in his right eye at the Battle of Corsica in 1794 after being struck by shrapnel, he was shot in the arm while leading a boarding party at Tenerife in 1797 which was consequently amputated to avoid infection and suffered further head injuries at the Battle of the Nile in 1798 which left him with a sizeable scar over his right eye. Information has just come to light that Britain's greatest sailor only had half a brow above his right eye, so consequently the museum has acted swiftly to ensure their life-size wax work of the hero is anatomically correct. The 200th anniversary of Nelson's great v

The Royal Navy Museum's official portrait of Admiral Lord Nelson which is considered to be the best likeness of the great man and is typical in it's view of him from his left side. Britain's most famous sailor favoured this view perhaps because his most visible battle wounds were to his right. Nelson died at the of the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 after being injured several times in previous conflicts. He lost the sight in his right eye at the Battle of Corsica in 1794 after being struck by shrapnel, he was shot in the arm while leading a boarding party at Tenerife in 1797 which was consequently amputated to avoid infection and suffered further head injuries at the Battle of the Nile in 1798 which left him with a sizeable scar over his right eye. Information has just come to light that Britain's greatest sailor only had half a brow above his right eye, so consequently the museum has acted swiftly to ensure their life-size wax work of the hero is anatomically correct. The 200th anniversary of Nelson's great v

Archant

In the wake of Norfolk Day may I ask who decided that Norfolk is “Nelson’s County” — and whether there are more appropriate alternatives?

Every time I return home to Norfolk and drive over one of more than 20 crossing points, a sign tells me that I am entering “Norfolk – Nelson’s County”. But when I enter the county, I also think of Elizabeth Fry and Edith Cavell. Of Tom Paine and Jeremiah Colman. Of Alan Bloom and Jenny Lind. Of John Skelton and Jack Burton. Of George Borrow and Anna Sewell. Of Samuel Pepys and Robert Kett. Of Boudicca and Diana, Princess of Wales. Of Mother Julian of Norwich and Jenny Lind. Of Dorothy Jewson and Kitty Higdon.
The Norfolk Tourist Information site advises that “When you visit Norfolk, you are walking in the steps of many famous men and women. Heroes and heroines from history as well as modern celebrities are among the list of names associated with the area.”
So who decided it is only Nelson’s County — and isn’t it time to ask the people of Norfolk who we would choose?
Perhaps every crossing point could highlight a different person who we are proud to associate with Norfolk?

Ann Reeder,

(Formerly of Roydon), Charlton Horethorne, Somerset.


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