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New book explores what was lost when Anglia Square was built

PUBLISHED: 08:35 29 September 2020 | UPDATED: 09:58 29 September 2020

Sovereign House under construction. Picture: Provided by Reg Walker of the HMSO Oldies. See their website https://hmsoldies.org.uk

Sovereign House under construction. Picture: Provided by Reg Walker of the HMSO Oldies. See their website https://hmsoldies.org.uk

Reg Walker/HMSO Oldies

Anglia Square this, Anglia Square that, Anglia Square the other…love it or loathe it, this is a part of the City of Norwich which is rarely out of the news.

Published this week…the supplement to the first Norwich Over the Water: demolition and change book by Matthew Williams. Picture: Courtesy of Matthew WilliamsPublished this week…the supplement to the first Norwich Over the Water: demolition and change book by Matthew Williams. Picture: Courtesy of Matthew Williams

Who knows exactly what the future now holds for this area which was knocked sideways by rampant civic vandalism in the 1960s and 70s.

Houses, shops, a chapel, a school, a cinema, streets and communities have been destroyed in the name of progress. When the “old” stood in the way of the “new.”

It appeared that people and places did not matter. They stood in the way of “progress,”

We should consider and appreciate what went before.

A rare picture of what was St Saviour’s School, pictured here in October 1967, which survived until after the flyover was built. The street at the back is St Paul’s Opening. If you have any memories of the school or the building  please get in touch with us. Photo: Geoffrey Goreham CollectionA rare picture of what was St Saviour’s School, pictured here in October 1967, which survived until after the flyover was built. The street at the back is St Paul’s Opening. If you have any memories of the school or the building please get in touch with us. Photo: Geoffrey Goreham Collection

Earlier this year Matthew Williams produced a brilliant book Norwich Over The Water: Demolition and Change looking at the northern city centre before and after redevelopment between 1965 and 1973.

This week a supplement to that book has been published featuring many more fascinating photographs.

Why?

“The catalyst for publishing the first book was the imminent commencement of a public inquiry into an application to redevelop Anglia Square,” explained Mr Williams.

A Jack Roberts photograph showing the Fellmonger public house being demolished  by the junction of Station Road and Oak Street. Picture: Jack Roberts ArchiveA Jack Roberts photograph showing the Fellmonger public house being demolished by the junction of Station Road and Oak Street. Picture: Jack Roberts Archive

Following publication it was discovered some were taken by the late Jack Roberts, then there were others from George Plunkett, George Swain and Geoffrey Goreham

“Within only two months of the first book appearing, enough material had become available to make a further publication worthwhile,” said Mr Williams.

So, instead of produce another standalone book, the supplement is a perfect companion to its big brother and includes some rare and fascinating photographs of the way it was.

Mr Williams said: “As before, my hope is that this cumulative visual record of what was done to Norwich Over the Water during the 1960s and 1970s, will help inform our understanding of what makes for a healthy development or otherwise.

Going, going, gone. An example of civic vandalism in its prime. The Calvert Street Methodist Chapel  closed on Sunday June 1966 and was demolished. Not because it was redundant but because it stood in the way of the inner link road. Pictured: Mike Adcock’s photograph showing its demolition in 1966.Going, going, gone. An example of civic vandalism in its prime. The Calvert Street Methodist Chapel closed on Sunday June 1966 and was demolished. Not because it was redundant but because it stood in the way of the inner link road. Pictured: Mike Adcock’s photograph showing its demolition in 1966.

“It is vital that sound decisions are made this time round, for the while city’s future.”

Mr Williams expressed his thanks to everyone who took the time and trouble to hunt out more important photographs for inclusion in the book.

The supplement costs just £4 and the original book is still available in the shops at £9.50, You can also order a copy from Mr Williams’ website at www.smartcycletraining.co.uk/pages/books.html

Going, going, gone. An example of civic vandalism in its prime. The Calvert Street Methodist Chapel  closed on Sunday June 1966 and was demolished. Not because it was redundant but because it stood in the way of the inner link road. Pictured: A Tony Brown picture of the chapel in 1965.Going, going, gone. An example of civic vandalism in its prime. The Calvert Street Methodist Chapel closed on Sunday June 1966 and was demolished. Not because it was redundant but because it stood in the way of the inner link road. Pictured: A Tony Brown picture of the chapel in 1965.

Competition winners

Thank you to everyone who entered the competitions to win copies of the books – Norwich Pubs and Breweries: Past and Present and The Old Courts and Yards of Norwich by Frances and Michael Holmes of the Norwich Heritage Projects.

The winners of the pub book were: John Palmer, Veronica Pearson, Stephanie Giles, Malcolm Metcalf and Sheila Bullard.

Those who won a copy of the best-selling courts and yard book were Robert Ashby, John Craft, Lynda Brandish. Jo Utting and Carina Moore.

A 1968 picture from the Geoffrey Goreham collection of the total transformation of the northern part of St George’s Street viewed from St Crispin’s Road with the original Odeon Cinema in the background.A 1968 picture from the Geoffrey Goreham collection of the total transformation of the northern part of St George’s Street viewed from St Crispin’s Road with the original Odeon Cinema in the background.

Coming up…your chance to win a copy of their latest offering….Norwich 1945 to 1960: A Journey from Austerity to Prosperity.

This is another fascinating slice of recent history. Packed with brilliant photographs, stories and personal memories.

Highlighting how life changed beyond all recognition between the end of the Second World War and the start of the swinging 60s.

Norwich Heritage Projects is an independent non-profit-making organisation which simply aims to encourage an appreciation of the heritage of a wonderful city.


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