Your chance to see famous Dippy the diplodocus skeleton at Norwich Cathedral

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: The skull of the Diplodocus hous

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: The skull of the Diplodocus housed at the Natural History Museum, London. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum - Credit: Trustees of the Natural History

He is an impressive 22 metres long, over 100 years old and has been adored by millions.

The Dean of Norwich, the Very Rev Jane Hedges, makes the big announcement that the Natural History M

The Dean of Norwich, the Very Rev Jane Hedges, makes the big announcement that the Natural History Museum's Diplodocus skeleton cast, known as Dippy, will be coming to the Norwich Cathedral in 2020 during it's national tour. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2016

Known affectionately as Dippy the diplodocus, the well-loved dinosaur model from London's Natural History Museum will be finishing a grand tour of Britain at Norwich Cathedral.

It will be on show in the historic building's nave from July-October 2020 after travelling to seven big venues across the country.

The Dean of Norwich, the Very Rev Jane Hedges, and Dr Phil Smith, in the Norwich Cathedral Nave wher

The Dean of Norwich, the Very Rev Jane Hedges, and Dr Phil Smith, in the Norwich Cathedral Nave where the Natural History Museum's Diplodocus skeleton cast, known as Dippy, will be standing when it arrives in 2020 during it's national tour. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2016

The tour starts in 2018 and celebrates the attraction which will be permanently removed from the museum's main Hintze Hall on January 3. It will be replaced by a blue whale skeleton next summer.

Dean of Norwich Cathedral Jane Hedges, said: 'The presence of Dippy in Norwich will naturally bring people from all backgrounds and beliefs and will stimulate questions and debate about creations and the origins of life as well as some of the major issues facing humanity today.'

Dr Phil Smith, co-ordinator of the Teacher's Scientist Network, talks about the Natural History Muse

Dr Phil Smith, co-ordinator of the Teacher's Scientist Network, talks about the Natural History Museum's Diplodocus skeleton cast, known as Dippy, coming to the Norwich Cathedral. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2016


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She added the 'exciting' exhibition would allow Norfolk residents who could not travel to London to see the dinosaur skeleton model.

The Bishop of Norwich, the Rt Rev Graham James, said: 'This will be a big event. Cathedrals are great places for doing big things.'

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: - A recent timelapse image of vi

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: - A recent timelapse image of visitors to the Natural History Museum, London, walking past the Diplodocus exhibit. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum - Credit: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

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Some 90 venues responded to a call to host Dippy and Norwich Cathedral is the only cathedral and East Anglian building to welcome him.

The model - cast from diplodocus bones discovered in Wyoming in 1898 - will be delivered in multiple boxes and put up over five days.

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: The Diplodocus exhibit at the Ca

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: The Diplodocus exhibit at the Carnegie Museum, Pennsylvania. Picture: Carnegie Museum of Natural History - Credit: Carnegie Museum of Natural History

As well as the free exhibition, it is hoped creative events related to Dippy, natural history and science will take place across the city.

Nick Bond, head of tourism for Visit Norwich, said Dippy's visit will create a big boost for the area.

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: Dippy awaiting London arrival.jp

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: Dippy awaiting London arrival.jpg - The transit of the Diplodocus exhibit to the The Natural History Mu-seum, London. Picture: Carnegie Museum of Natural History - Credit: Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Dippy's fascinating history

The iconic model of Dippy the diplodocus is a replica cast of a skeleton discovered in 1898 and was unveiled at London's Natural History Museum on May 12, 1905.

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: The Diplodocus exhibit with chi

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: The Diplodocus exhibit with children at the Natural History Museum, London. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum - Credit: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

Railroad workers unearthed the fossilised bones in Wyoming, USA, and at the time newspapers billed the discovery as the 'most colossal animal on Earth'.

The skeleton was acquired by Scottish-born millionaire businessman Andrew Carnegie to be used as a centrepiece for his Pittsburg museum in the USA.

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: The Diplodocus exhibit with chil

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: The Diplodocus exhibit with children at the Natural History Museum, London. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum - Credit: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

During the reconstruction of the dinosaur at the Carnegie Museum, experts discovered subtle differences between the two other diplodocus species known at the time - diplodocus longus and diplodocus lacustris.

The new species was named diplodocus carnegii in honour of its owner.

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: Historical images detailing the

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: Historical images detailing the arrival of the Diplodocus in London. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum - Credit: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

Mr Carnegie commissioned a cast of his dinosaur for the Natural History Museum after King Edward VII, who reigned from 1901-1910, saw a sketch of the diplodocus and remarked how much he would like a similar specimen for the attraction.

Dippy is one of 10 replicas of the original D. carnegii in museums around the world, including Paris, Berlin, Vienna, and Moscow.

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: A skull to tail representation o

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: A skull to tail representation of the Diplodocus exhibit housed at the Natural History Museum, London. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum - Credit: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

Before it was unveiled in the London museum in 1905, the 292 bone skeleton arrived in 36 boxes.

During the Second World War the skeleton was disassembled and relocated to the basement to protect it from bomb damage.

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: Recent images detailing a conser

Dippy the dinosaur is visiting Norwich Cathedral in 2020. Pictured: Recent images detailing a conservation inspection of the Diplodocus exhibit at the Natural History Museum, London. Picture: Trustees of the Natural History Museum - Credit: Trustees of the Natural History Museum

In 1979 the diplodocus made the move to Hintze Hall.

The dinosaur's head originally pointed downwards with the tail resting on the ground. Following new research in the 1960s, the neck was raised to a horizontal position and in 1993, the tail was repositioned to curve over visitors' heads.

Are you involved in a natural history project? Email sophie.wyllie@archant.co.uk

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