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Weird Norfolk

At a lost hall in a lost village near Morningthorpe there is a persistent rumour that Oliver Cromwell’s repentant ghost was said to appear on the staircase

Beware the devil dog of Lenwade, Lyng and Attlebridge, “a little-known fiend” who prefers to prowl in limited locations

This year Stacia and Siofra have recorded a series of special episodes for Heritage Open Days.

Beware the glowing ghost lights of the Lantern Man of Irstead that can lure you to a watery grave or torment you outside your house

The Victorian serial killer who murdered time after time in Happisburgh and who was buried with a poker and coal tongs to use in hell

In 1936 a former Lord Mayor of Norwich spotted an unusual creature of the coast at Eccles-on Sea. The sighting sparked a heated debate on the Eastern Daily Press letters pages. Stacia and Siofra discuss possible explanations for what he and his friends saw.

Can we really slip into another time zone as easily as we’d walk from one room to the next? The curious case of the Great Yarmouth shop with a ghostly assistant

The giant sinkhole in Dilham which not only swallowed several oxen, but also an entire church – were fairies responsible?

Something strange in the sky near Hainford: the day a bright orange flying saucer cast a spell of eerie silence over a field close to Cromer Road

From shipwrecked treasure to witch bottles filled with magic to repel curses, Alex Wright’s magical Swaffham museum is a wonderful box of delights

It may be time to ask East Anglia’s St Edmund for help: he’s the patron saint of pandemics AND he may have been buried in Lyng

A haunted wood, a strange stone that bleeds and a host of legends that link it to a martyred Saint, a ruined nunnery and ritual sacrifices.

Do you need a cure for “…colic…melancholy…the clammy humours of the body” or an “over-moist brain”? Head for Reffley Spring near King’s Lynn.

A terrible shapeshifting horror, a ghost that rattles the chains that drowned him, a spectral coach and horses and a phantom donkey: Geldeston in Norfolk boasts ghosts aplenty

Why did the Swaffham gravestone twist itself away from what was buried underneath it?

The Eccles church claimed by the waves which occasionally appears after a storm when sea-bleached skeletons appear in the sand.

Does the spirit of a murdered woman still roam the rooms of a shop on Magdalen Street, or has she finally found the peace she was denied in life?

An unsettling time slip in Horning: “The three began to feel uneasy, noting that a strange silence had descended…The landscape became blurry and the houses were replaced by ancient cottages.”

Black Shuck in Blakeney: “She heard the ‘light dragging and tinkling of a chain’ but could see nothing – whatever made the noise, however, followed her as she walked…”

Brograve Mill stands as a lonely sentinel on land once owned by a man said to have made a bargain with the Devil which he had no intention of honouring.

She was the wise woman of Walsham who could reverse the ‘evil eye’ and whose work was still remembered within living memory.

They’re the spectral traffic police who charge at incoming traffic in Hedenham in an old-fashioned coach drawn by a team of horses.

Could Gorleston have once been Norfolk’s answer to Stonehenge complete with a stone circle used for ancient worship?

The red-faced ghost of Rollesby with a case of mistaken identity – is it a murderer or a victim of murder whose face appears covered in blood?

How do you solve a problem like Sister Barbara?

The wise women of Wells-next-the-Sea involved in two murder cases – but who escaped trial at both.

At the tail-end of the 1800s, a series of strange goings-on haunted Bumbler’s Farm in Shelfanger: doors opened and closed of their own accord, a towel roller in the kitchen spun violently as if powered by an unseen hand, ornaments in the parlour crashed to the ground and the ghostly figure of a woman was seen.

At the meeting point of two links in one of Norfolk’s ancient ley lines there is a ghostly rider – the White Lady of Kirby Bedon.

The ghostly bride that haunts old Catton wearing her wedding dress and drifting across the road after a premature and tragic death.

She was a Great Yarmouth legend with delusions of grandeur, but ‘Queen’ Martha Stanninot was treated with respect in the seaside town.

Forget DFLs in North Norfolk – it was UFOs visiting on New Year’s Eve 1978 that had everyone in Cromer talking.

In Weird Norfolk’s history of mysteries, sightings of UFOs remain high on the list of unsolved phenomena. In the late 1970s, a flying saucer was spotted hovering above the rooftops of Dereham town centre.

You got your money’s worth at Spixworth Hall in terms of things that go bump in the night – with three ghosts for the price of one.

Two eye-witness accounts of the Hethersett Faines –“I thought it was two boys, one on the other’s shoulders playing a prank, but then I realised it wasn’t…”

We’ve all heard of Casper the Friendly Ghost: but did you know that Norfolk boasted its own sociable spirit in Harleston?

Most of us are aware that a witch’s familiar is often a cat – but less of us know the story behind Great Yarmouth’s Kitty Witches.

If you go down to the woods today, you may have a grim surprise…Listen out for the ghost of a murderer left hanging in a gibbet in Bacton Woods.

Accused of murdering children and entertaining evil spirits, the case against Ellen Garrison looked bleak: but perhaps Witchfinder General Matthew Hopkins had met his match in a Norfolk woman.

It has stood as a sentinel for centuries, a lonely, lichen-covered reminder of a frozen past when sabre-toothed tigers and woolly mammoths roamed the plains of East Anglia.

They seemed like sisters of mercy, but the nuns at Marham were anything but – the ghostly tale of Sister Barbara, whose ghost is seen on gliding on a West Norfolk hill.

It sounds like a dark fairytale: a demon locked away in a tall turret, hidden from view – at Acle’s St Edmund church, fear was once written on the walls.

A talisman to protect against witches or an invitation to the Devil? The story behind the strange ‘witch brick’ found at Earlham Hall.

The drowned drummer boy who paid with his life after skating on thin ice all in the name of love, a Weird Norfolk Valentine that will touch all but the coldest of hearts

The poltergeist who plagued a village near Downham Market council house and a cautionary tale about receiving visitors during an exorcism.

Norfolk used to boast the devil’s hoof print in King’s Lynn, said to be a remainder of his thwarted attempts to steal souls after arriving to the town by ship.

If you go down to the woods in Brooke...do you know why the ghost of a shrieking woman has been spotted between the trees?

The ghostly light shed by a skeleton buried beneath the road at East Runton floats close to a cornmill whose cap was used by fishermen to guide them home.

A trail of lights in the sky that has fascinated stargazers the world over have been spotted above North Norfolk.

A fireball spotted by several stargazers in the skies over Norfolk has been described as a “white-hot star”.

It’s a tale as old as time: neighbours falling out over a petty dispute – but in this Norfolk case, it ended with an enchanted cow and an accusation of witchcraft.

If only this stone could speak: the stories it could tell. Merton’s gigantic boulder has – according to legend – been the scene of at least one orgy and may hold the key to Armageddon.

They are windows into a former bone house where thousands of skeletons were stored in piles – right next to Norwich Cathedral and in a former sixth form common room.

A New Year’s Eve ghost story from Ranworth with a moral: lead a terrible life and the Devil will come knocking for you and steal you away.

Don’t wear bright clothes or strong-smelling perfume, listen for knocking and shrieking and try and sniff out bad body odour: just a normal day trip for the Weird Norfolk team.

A chest filled with gold and thrown to the bottom of a Norfolk pond and a battle with the Devil to claim the treasure – there could only be one winner.

It’s a shaggy dog story for dark nights that ends in tragedy: when a driver hit a large, ghostly black dog on the edge of the Brecks, it burst into flames and within days, the man was dead…

Today we settle down to be entertained by real-life tragedies on television, and lap up true crime podcasts. But our fascination with murder is nothing new.

The tall tale of a Norfolk village that bred Giants, one of whom joined Greatest Showman PT Barnum in his cabinet of human curiosities and who married a Giantess, was exhibited as a marvel of nature and who ended his days buried close to a witch.

For centuries a holy well brought crowds and wealth to what is now a field opposite Burnham Market primary school writes Rowan Mantell

The lore and legends about the existence of secret underground passages that criss-cross Norfolk have fascinated generations – one such tunnel is said to have once been under Ingham church’s altar.

It’s little surprise that so many air force bases are said to be haunted if you think about the number of men in the prime of their lives who never returned from wartime sorties and whose bodies never received a proper burial – can you hear one on this chilling recording?

Our final live recording of 2019 is hosted by The Merchant’s House.

More evidence has been received about the Wildman of Watton, Bigfoot of the Forest, the Beast of the A1075, whatever you choose to call the creature that many have seen stalking through the trees near Thetford: Weird Norfolk talked to the woman compiling their stories.

Linger too long in an isolated place while twilight falls and you risk a visit from the elusive Hikey Sprites, the curious creatures that creep from the shadows at night and which serve as a timely warning to keep walking towards the light, the Boggarts of the Norfolk folklore world.

This week we are hosted by Biddy’s Tearoom in Norwich, where we hear all sorts of strange and spooky tales.

Cor blimey – did the Devil jump at the chance of taking ownership of a slice of Corpusty real estate when human bones were denied a Christian burial?

This week’s Weird Norfolk is a cautionary tale about being careful what you wish for.

This week we tiptoe over the border to Suffolk to have a chat with local historian and paranormal expert, Ivan Bunn

Weird Norfolk has put together a Weird Walk for King’s Lynn as part of the Norfolk Walking and Cycling Festival, which returns this October and will see a host of events which celebrate the county with an exciting range of events for all ages, abilities and interests. Find a dragon’s tongue, one of Norfolk’s most haunted houses, the place where a witch’s heart bounced to the river and far more on a walk that highlights Lynn’s weirder side.

Ghosthunters believe they may have caught paranormal activity on camera in a Norfolk café after an ornament ‘inexplicably’ fell from a shelf.

How stones in Norfolk were thought to be an insurance policy against catching the plague in medieval times (Spoiler: they didn’t work).

The Thetford railway bridge ghost that returned to set the record straight and clear his name

The phantom black dog of Buxton that foretold the death of a loved one and why it’s best to be cautious when visiting rural churchyards in Norfolk at twilight...

To marry one woman accused of witchcraft is misfortunate, to marry two is plain suspicious.

Dragons, demons, monks and artists haunt lonely, lovely St Benet’s Abbey - and there’s just time for a free guided tour before the dark days of winter.

We often complain that we’re stuck in the middle of nowhere when we find ourselves lost in unfamiliar surroundings. But what happens when you want to be stuck in the middle of Nowhere but you just can’t find it? Weird Norfolk go looking for the Nowheres in the county.

Whistle and he’ll come to you: at a church in Norfolk, it’s said that Satan can be summoned by a strange ritual. Weird Norfolk find out what it takes to see the Devil in Swanton Morley.

A family hoping for a holiday packed with sun, sea and sandcastles in Great Yarmouth were surprised to find a guest had already taken up residence in the caravan they had been renting for four days - an invisible entity which made it perfectly clear it wanted them to leave.

They are the pebble-hunter’s Holy Grail, the all-seeing eyes that protect us from nightmares and witches. Weird Norfolk looks at witch stones – the pebbles with holes all the way through them – and finds out the folklore that surrounds them

The Witch of Loddon, the biting imps and her daughter Mary, who escaped a pact with Satan in order to marry her Lucky Chance – and it happened less than 150 years ago…

From the Black Shuck to an oak tree grown from a witch buried there, a new book celebrates the county’s weird and wonderful folklore.

This Norfolk building boasts not one ghost but almost 40 – from lost boys waiting for a father who never returns to a young woman who fell in love with the wrong man, a poltergeist and even the ghosts of some pub drinkers.

It’s a ripple in a field which hides a stupendous secret - here, between two ugly electricity pylons on the fringes of Norwich there once stood an incredible treasure: Norfolk’s answer to Stonehenge.

The legend of Fiddler’s Hill tells the story of an ill-fated violinist who decided to investigate a ghostly monk who would emerge each night from a tunnel running between Binham and Walsingham – it didn’t end well for him.

Norwich Ghost Walks are set to haunt the city once more as they return with three new storytellers taking over from The Shadowcaster who has “been sent on a dark quest”.

It’s a ripple in a field which hides a stupendous secret – here, between two ugly electricity pylons on the fringes of Norwich there once stood an incredible treasure: Norfolk’s answer to Stonehenge.

In a village whose name suggests restful sleep, something terrifying yet oddly familiar prowled the streets: White Shuck of Great Snoring.

For centuries humans have debated whether alien lifeforms exist. One man has been sure that they do for more than 40 years, even creating a community of UFO enthusiasts in East Anglia.

Reporter MARC BETTS went to meet Tony Buckingham.

The grisly tale of Happisburgh Torso – the ghost of a sailor without legs and with a head trailing behind him on a thin strip of flesh – is one told next to roaring fires and on dark and stormy nights and which still has the power to terrify today. CAUTION: not for the faint-hearted!

This week is all about the wonderful Sarah Hare, wax effigies and blood poisoning.

If you go down to the woods today, you’re sure of a big surprise…

A ghostly town appears beneath a meadow, a thief is cursed and dogs die in suspicious circumstances.

The udderly terrifying tale of the ghost cows of Hethersett which once roamed the village, their saucer-eyes glowing in the dark.

It fell to earth during a storm on Halloween and marked the gateway from Norfolk to hell – was the Southery stone a visitor from outer space and why did naked women sit on it for good luck?

On the edge of Norwich city centre, a bombed-out church has been reduced to just its tower – but before tragedy hit St Bartholomew’s Church in Heigham, it was at the centre of a frenzied ghost hunt

Across the county, the sightings of the legendary big cat of Norfolk were once fairly common

A terrible end to a tragic life – staked through the heart and buried at a lonely crossroads in Norfolk after being accused of murdering her own daughter, poor Mary Turrell’s final resting place was close to a tree said to have grown from the stake that pinned a killer to the ground.

A picture that was haunted by the woman it captured and a chair that summoned the spirit of a flame-haired ghost if placed close to a fireplace: one house in Norfolk boasted them both.

This week we have an eyewitness account of the Grey Lady of Tombland. Bridget Pye joins us to share her strange encounter.

One of Norwich’s most colourful characters from the past, Father Ignatius was a preacher and a mystic who established a monastery in Elm Hill in 1863 – and can still be seen there today.

Theatres are well known for hosting plays and disappearing acts but “unexplained” shadow figures aren’t usually part of the script.

In Weird Norfolk’s history of mysteries, sightings of UFOs remain high on the list of unsolved phenomena. In the late 1970s, a flying saucer was spotted hovering above the rooftops of Dereham town centre – did it return, years later, for another visit?

“A customer stood by the till and said they felt someone, or something, touching their shoulder...” Has a shop in Brandon caught evidence of a ghost on CCTV?

It’s a lament said to travel across the centuries, a shriek that rips through time to tell the tale of a woman who loved and lost and whose spirit wanders in North Norfolk, restlessly searching for the baby murdered by her jealous husband.

The grinning skeletons found where Great Yarmouth Fire Station stands today and the whistling, faceless ghosts that haunted fire fighters who longed for late-night call-outs to escape the horror at their HQ.

Is the strange stone of Harleston named after a marauding Dane or a Danish king? Was it where land was given to locals or where locals were warned of an invasion? Weird Norfolk try to carve out the answer.

Lined up in a cell in Norwich Castle Museum’s dungeon, their lifeless faces may look eerily calm, but these ‘death heads’ were thought to hold the secret to identifying psychopaths. Weird Norfolk goes underground to discover the hidden history of Norfolk’s murderers.

The eerie tale of the Swaffham gravestone that moved of its own accord, the woman who lay beneath it and the reason why the stone may well have tried to make an escape bid from her.

A special tale for Easter: the storm-raising witch from King’s Lynn said to have used eggs to drown sailors

The team are at Norwich Cathedral again and this week we have a chat about the Lantern Man of Thurlton. Siofra becomes starstruck as Budge the cat drops by.

A new behind-the-scenes tour at Holkham Hall allows visitors to discover how life was lived upstairs and downstairs in the servants’ areas, attics and the cellars at Holkham Hall. Today, Weird Norfolk follows the tour guide up the winding staircase to the highest tower rooms and attics.

A Shaggy dog story - the tale of Black Shuck in Coltishall: “As big as a calf and noiseless as death”

A pact with the Devil, a midnight ritual and the sacrifice of a toad – it sounds like medieval witchcraft, but in fact it’s a ritual which took place in Norfolk within living memory. Weird Norfolk examine Norfolk’s amphibian witchcraft.

Standing as a signpost to a village that longer bustles, in a rhododendron clearing in the woods, Mark Goldsworthy’s timber carving shows the curious tale of the brave Bishop Beaver of Babingley.

At Norfolk’s own Borley Rectory at Syderstone near Fakenham, a Reverend and his family were plagued by a terrifying poltergeist. But just who was the ghost who wreaked havoc on a holy man’s house?

She’s been seen in the streets, houses and churches of Tombland, a grey lady who glides through walls and hides a terrible secret: when she was locked into a room with her plague victim parents, she ate their flesh to stay alive and met her end choking on their flesh.

This week’s weird wander takes us to Syderstone near Fakenham and a haunted parsonage which made a small Norfolk village a national sensation. In this first of two parts, today we look at the haunting of Syderstone parsonage.

It’s the tale of two tragic sisters, an attic bedroom at Felbrigg Hall, ghosts caught on camera and deadly wallpaper – just what secrets does one of North Norfolk’s best-loved stately homes hide?

In the midst of the dead, one name stands out: Oliver Tomkins, the Great Yarmouth man who went to preach the word of God to “savages” but whose reward was to be cooked and eaten by cannibals almost 120 years ago.

There are secrets hidden in every corner of Norfolk, even in the least expected places: what today forms part of a modern shopping mall was once the place where city people went to have curses removed and good luck restored.

She’s been seen in the streets, houses and churches of Tombland, a grey lady who glides through walls and hides a terrible secret: when she was locked into a room with her plague victim parents, she ate their flesh to stay alive and met her end choking on their flesh.

It’s the impressive tale of a dragon, a labyrinth under Ludham and a daring escape to a riverside abbey. Weird Norfolk finds out if the Ludham Dragon is still lurking underground.

This week we discuss the infamous red balloon ghost of Chapelfield Mall as well other hauntings in the shopping centre.

Weird Norfolk takes a tour of the Bridewell’s Undercroft, where fascinating stories of merchants and misery await.

It’s one of Norfolk’s most famous landmarks boasting the tallest tower in the county which gazes out over a beloved part of the coastline – but when Cromer Church’s chancel lay in ruins before it was rebuilt in the 19th century, something terrifying lay in wait for the faithful.

After Weird Norfolk took readers on an underground adventure to find a hidden street deep below one of Norwich’s busiest roads, the charity that runs the subterranean tours has announced another 70 dates when they will be opening up the caverns beneath Castle Meadow.

To marry one woman accused of witchcraft is misfortunate, to marry two is plain suspicious. Weird Norfolk recount the tale of the Norwich man who may have seen two wives sent to their deaths for witchcraft.

In a village whose name suggests restful sleep, something terrifying yet oddly familiar prowled the streets: White Shuck of Great Snoring.

If a ghost you should meet; as you walk down the street – the street of Short Beck as it’s known – just hold your head high and don’t cry ‘oh my!’ or with fear you’ll be chilled to the bone: these ghosts are so clever they always endeavour to frighten you out of your wits but the ghost in Long Lane you should treat with disdain or you’ll suffer some panicky fits…

It was a curious case of bewitched sausages which saw a Great Yarmouth man seek an enchanting cure from a town wise woman.

A new haunted theatrical dining experience has launched in the historic Norwich Guildhall, with spine-tingling stories from those that occupied its cells awaiting trial.

Last year, we brought you news of the Wildman of Watton or Bigfoot of the Forest who has been spotted along the A1075 in a number of sightings from 1986 onwards – witnesses have reported bear-like creatures and shaggy beasts that walk on two legs in the wooded areas that shroud the road.

In the shadow of Norfolk’s most famous ‘mountain’ - the aftermath of Norfolk’s glacial legacy – lies a mysterious pond said to the ghostly resting place of a spectral coachman who can be seen driving his horse and cart into its inky depths.

Some say the video is definitive proof that ghosts exist: a red balloon appears to be floating through intu Chapelfield shopping centre in Norwich as if being held by an invisible hand, it floats down the escalator and then comes to rest by a chair at a café area.

Mighty oaks from little acorns grow, but in Ashwellthorpe, a little Christmas magic meant the oak tree in questions sprung up in front of a festive crowd’s very eyes.

We’ve all heard of ghosts that rattle chains - but ghosts that rattle bedsteads in terrace houses in King’s Lynn? No wonder crowds flocked in their hundreds to see what the spectre would do next.

Everyone secretly hoped they’d catch more than just a glimpse of the magical menagerie making its way through the Broadland village of Potter Heigham - but you should always be careful what you wish for.

It looked like any other council house in the row, a sturdily-built home, close to local amenities and perfect for a growing family – particularly one with an attendant poltergeist.

In Sheringham, there is a special name for the severe squalls which sometimes besiege the coast in this corner of Norfolk: the sudden strong winds which cause brief but violent storms are known as Yow Yows – and those Yow Yows are said to be linked to the captain of an old, drowned ship.

Remember, remember the beginning of November…it was the month, back in 1995, when Norfolk’s skies were lit up by close encounters of the third kind.

It’s Norfolk’s own Diagon Alley, a hidden street completely hidden from the Muggle world, a secret deep below a bustling Norwich street accessed not through The Leaky Cauldron, but rather through the headquarters of a charity which encourages people to be kind.

A Norfolk castle, the She-Wolf of France, a murder and bloodcurdling shrieks which have heard for centuries – the spine-tingling story of Queen Isabella’s haunting of Castle Rising has been passed down through generations.

Everyone who is anyone in Norfolk knows the legend of Black Shuck – but have you heard of the county’s other demon dog with flaming eyes which haunts Burgh Castle, and sometimes further afield into Great Yarmouth?

At the tail-end of the 1800s, a series of strange goings-on haunted Bumbler’s Farm in Shelfanger: doors opened and closed of their own accord, a towel roller in the kitchen spun violently as if powered by an unseen hand, ornaments in the parlour crashed to the ground and the ghostly figure of a woman was seen.

There are secrets hidden in every corner of Norfolk, even in the least expected places: what today forms part of a modern shopping mall was once the place where city people went to have curses removed and good luck restored.

The strangest stories are hidden in plain sight behind buildings which look as unremarkable as any other, but which harbour secrets which are passed down through the years by wide-eyed witnesses who have spotted something unusual about their workplace.

It’s the highest Norman motte in England although no trace remains of the castle built in turbulent times which it housed: but today’s tale regards the hill, not what topped it.

An East Anglian theatre company is keen to hear your extraterrestrial experiences at two special Flying Saucers Cafes being held in Norfolk and Suffolk - do you know if the truth is out there?

Let’s weave a Weird Norfolk Fairytale of our own: pull up a chair, huddle closer to the fire and let me begin with the curious tale of King Gurgunt and the Frozen Bear.

It’s the little-known story of a Phantom of the Office that haunts one of Norwich’s most ancient streets.

Remember the so-called Millennial Bug which we were told would bring the world grinding to a standstill and lead to technological apocalypse?

In 1980, Norfolk staged its own Y2K trial run.

Sea frets have often blurred the lines between this world and the next – and one such creature to appear from the mist is the Old Man of Hopton, who stalks the A47 in front of terrified drivers, some of whom claim to have driven straight through him.

As ghostly goings-on go, North Walsham can boast a host of hauntings.

Shakespeare counselled that one should neither a borrower nor a lender be and in Burgh St Peter, a deal was struck that led to this phrase quite literally haunting the pair who made it.

It was Norfolk and Suffolk’s unexplained humming noise which fed suspicions of an alien invasion or UFO activity and which could only be heard…by women.

Could that slight chill in an upstairs corridor, that shimmer of shifting light on the staircase, those footsteps fading into silence be one of our county’s most intriguing apparitions?

He was the feral child who became a human pet at the grandest household in Georgian England, a boy said to have been raised by wolves who swapped finery for a cell when he visited Norwich.

Will o’ the Wisp, or Lantern Man, has led Norfolk travellers a merry dance for hundreds of years. Stacia Briggs and Siofra Connor go in search of this elusive, mysterious ‘cold fire’.

Today, it’s in the heart of the city – but in 1823, Rampant Horse Street was at the heart of a deeply distressing tale of bodysnatching from five Norwich churches.

Like the very best ghost stories of all, this one was discovered by chance, pasted in the back of an old magazine dated 1736 and titled ‘A Strange Occurrence’.

Long before The Giant in Twin Peaks told Agent Dale Cooper, Norfolk knew that the owls were not as they seem. For more than a century, there have been reports of glowing owls streaking across county skies in the dark of night, luminous birds that appear like flying spectres, feathered ghosts causing those that see them to believe they had seen something truly other-worldly.

When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out contagion, the witching time of night is when the spectral woman appears, clad in red and seemingly tethered to the remains of a cross-stone which once towered over this lonely patch of Norfolk.

Avid readers will remember last week’s story of the ghost who made a guest appearance on Anglia Television and a promise to tell the tale of the Mad Monk of Morley Hall in more detail and his link to Binham Priory.

It was set to be a televised example of how a ghost hunter worked and proved to be so effective that a ghost actually appeared to make a guest appearance.

Standing as a signpost to a village that longer bustles, in a rhododendron clearing in the woods, Mark Goldsworthy’s timber carving shows the curious tale of the brave Bishop Beaver of Babingley.

Thousands of us pass over it every day without a passing thought for the role it played in Norwich’s dark past.

The road name tells a story – one of a terrible crime from years past, a woman’s death immortalised forever in two words: “Cutthroat Lane”.

The ruins are spectacular and hint at a majesty long since claimed by time – but the broken walls of Bromholm Priory hide an even bigger secret: they once housed a holy relic said to be so powerful it could raise the dead.

No one knows why Old Hunch has returned from the grave to haunt the streets of Long Stratton but his effigy in the parish is a constant reminder of a soul that is yet to find peace.

The ghost of a well-known impresario and a host of hauntings mean that Cromer Pier is a magnet for paranormal investigators - those spirits do love to be beside the seaside.

Not only can visitors look into the face of the devil at a Norfolk church, they can also see the ancient barrow where he buried the gates to hell after digging the nearby dyke that bears his name.

In the heart of the Fens is a lonely church which, legend has it, makes its own entertainment thanks to a haunted Victorian pipe organ.

It had hung above the bar of a Norfolk pub for 60 years but reports of illness, discord and misfortune surrounded the goat’s head of Strumpshaw.

It was a time when the gruesome exploits of a band of ruthless men cast a shadow on the world of science as they stole corpses from graveyards - but in Norfolk, it was the surgeon son of a Yarmouth vicar who actually commissioned the deed.

Does the spirit of a murdered woman still roam the rooms of a shop on Magdalen Street, or has she finally found the peace she was denied in life?

Menaced at sunset by a hooded spectre that leapt from behind a stone left behind by a river of ice, a Norfolk farmer decided to lay the ghost to rest by guarding it from his grave for eternity.

It escaped complete destruction in a 1915 bombing raid, was struck by lightning on Midsummer’s Night in 1950 and boasts a ghost in the basement - Dereham’s Corn Exchange hides a dark secret: a black-clad spirit who roams underground.

When the giant from the marshes met the ogre from the Fens, the ensuing battle was brutal and bloody and led to the creation of a legend passed down by families for hundreds of years.

An unholy row broke out after the lord of a Norfolk manor removed coffins from beneath the local church to create room for his own family - it’s never wise to disturb the dead...

They say still waters run deep, and the Lily Pit at Gorleston is no exception. Rumours abound that the pit was once haunted - but which of the three stories attached to it rings the truest?

Al Stewart claimed The Year of the Cat was in 1976 when he released an album of the same – but in Norfolk, the year of the cat was most definitely 2011.

As the year draws to a close we take a look back at the some of the most popular Weird Norfolk stories of 2017. Follow the links for the full stories.

Was Brockdish Hall the backdrop for a tragic tale which saw a Christmas bride entombed in a chest for 50 long and lonely years?

A haunted wood, a strange stone that bleeds and a host of legends that link it to a martyred Saint, a ruined nunnery and ritual sacrifices.

Brograve Mill stands as a lonely sentinel on land once owned by a man said to have made a bargain with the Devil which he had no intention of honouring.

It was an underground experiment which set out to find scientific evidence of the afterlife – and there were some startling discoveries

It’s a stretch of road like no other in Norfolk, a spirit level which crosses the misty marshes to link a Broadland market town to the seaside.

It had been an unremarkable if pleasant evening spent with friends at a reading room in Bungay but it would end with something quite remarkable.

She is the patron saint of women who wished to be freed from abusive husbands, a woman whose commitment to avoiding her marriage to a pagan king saw her grow a beard overnight in order to repel him from the union.

They were an ordinary family in an ordinary house in an ordinary street. But what happened behind closed doors was absolutely extraordinary.

He’s the invisible menace that terrified us as children. But is there more to the bogeyman than an imaginary behaviour monitor?

In a special edition of Weird Norfolk, our mysterious tour guide rows down the River Wensum in 360 to bring you the most terrifying tales from the area surrounding Norwich’s best known river.

Norfolk’s curator, Siofra Connor and EDP photographer Antony Kelly went out to the ruins of St Mary’s church at East Somerton to see if they could capture some of the atmosphere of this magical place.

The Wildman of Watton or Bigfoot of the Forest, whatever name you choose to give the creature, there’s mounting evidence of a Sasquatch on the loose

Blickling has a famous ghost – more about her another day – but other spirits have made the hall their home, including the man whose ancestor built the Jacobethan mansion.

Lost children in a dark forest, a wicked uncle blinded by greed and a story passed down through generations. Weird Norfolk investigates the Babes in the Wood.

“Remember that you must die,” is the literal translation of Memento Mori and reflects the Christian theory of considering one’s own mortality in order to lead a better, less selfish life in order to escape eternal punishment at judgement day.

While they were essential to an enchanting Arabian Night, magical carpets aren’t just confined to folklore and far-flung lands – in Norfolk, the thread of a story of one such carpet and its Tudor home has been embroidered through the centuries from the 1700s.

As the flames licked the stone walls and the building began to crack and fall, parishioners feared nothing would remain of their beloved church at St Peter and St Paul’s church at Tunstall, a beacon for ships on the edge of a long-lost estuary which is now lonely marshland that stretches towards Great Yarmouth.

It has stood as a sentinel for centuries, a lonely, lichen-covered reminder of a frozen past when sabre-toothed tigers and woolly mammoths roamed the plains of East Anglia.

Hidden from the Holt Road are the relics of a prosperous past, the skeleton of a once-magnificent manor house once home to the Heydon family, a hidden gem now owned by English Heritage and boasting a very curious caretaker: a spectral sentry.

In the small village of Bawburgh, just a few miles outside of Norwich, lies a small well, next to a church. An unremarkable structure, in an unremarkable location or is it?

Just a stone’s throw from the swallowed town of Shipden and Cromer’s famous pier, local folklore tells of a ghost dog that haunts the beach, waiting where the waves break on the sand for an owner who never returned from the sea.

It is the vanishing village that just can’t stay silent, a forgotten parish from the Norfolk coast that was swallowed by the sea, the county’s own Atlantis just a stone’s throw from the famous Cromer Pier.

The earliest depictions of the devil show him in various forms – with scaly skin, folded wings and with cloven hooves, often attributed to early illustrations of the Pagan God Pan, who would have been reviled by good Christians.

She was the wise washerwoman of Irstead whose predictions, proverbs and observations were shared across Norfolk in the late 1700s and early to mid 1800s.

Unseasonal storms had all but blown away by the time that the former Lord Mayor of Norwich, London MP and their friend went for a stroll on Eccles beach in Norfolk, a quiet stretch of coastline – or it was until the appearance of Norfolk Nessie.

It is a curious inscription that links a quiet Norfolk village to an infamous French Queen who became a symbol of the excesses of the monarchy and famous for a quote she may never have even said: “let them eat cake”.

The haunting ivy-clad ruins hide behind a thicket of trees and a fairytale tangle of brambles, their ghostly secrets protected by the passage of time.

How handy it would be, in times of austerity, to rely on a visit from a Fairy Godmother who could appear at precisely the moment she was needed to wave her magic wand and make everything better.

We’ve heard of the Beast of Cumbria and the Creature of Cornwall, but what about the Cat of Congham?

It’s a lament said to travel across the centuries, a shriek that rips through time to tell the tale of a woman who loved and lost and whose spirit wanders in North Norfolk, restlessly searching for the baby murdered by her jealous husband.

California had a Gold Rush in the 1840s, East Anglia had a Coprolite Rush in the late 19th century – a different kind of black gold made from fossilised faeces.

Her birth was a Blessing, but her death was a curse: Rebecca Nurse from Great Yarmouth was one of three sisters accused of witchcraft at the infamous Salem Witch Trials and was the second person to be hanged.

It’s a heartrending story which for generations has acted as a warning to warring siblings.

It’s one of East Anglia’s most enduring folk tales, that of a midnight black hell hound with eyes as red as glowing coals that roams the countryside and brings death to the door of anyone unfortunate to lock eyes with him.

It’s a rare reminder of a time when the warrens that carved a honeycomb under the Brecks were a rich source of income for landowners.

We sent our Weird Norfolk correspondent to Norwich Castle Museum to select her top five weird and wonderful exhibits.

It’s a lively town square famous for funfairs and festivals, the beating heart of King’s Lynn’s social scene.

It’s a whole new take on the concept of a siren call that saw the tables turned on a mermaid lured to shore by the sweet singing of a Sheringham congregation.

It was a dazzling light show that bewitched astronomers watching the night sky above Norwich - but was it proof of life on other planets?

The floating figure appeared just before the witching hour, an almost transparent apparition that appeared to climb invisible stairs before melting into the darkness before the eyes of a horrified woman walking home along Sandy Lane in Dereham after a night out with friends.

Sleeping Beauty pricked her finger and slept for 100 years until she was woken by a handsome prince - but for Norfolk’s Sarah Hare, no kiss can wake her from an eternal slumber.

Norfolk is filled with Medieval buildings, but the ruins of St Mary’s Church at East Somerton are linked to a story like no other.

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