West Norfolk Jubilee Youth Orchestra

The young musicians of the West Norfolk Jubilee Youth Orchestra Concert Band tackled a challenging and busy programme but they rose to the festive occasion at King's Lynn Corn Exchange.

By RICHARD PARR

The young musicians of the West Norfolk Jubilee Youth Orchestra Concert Band tackled a challenging and busy programme but they rose to the festive occasion at King's Lynn Corn Exchange.

In a richly contrasting programme, the enthusiastic and gifted music makers entertained in first-class style.

Under the baton of conductor Joan Hooke and leader Tom Taylor, the concert opened with Schubert's “Italian Style” Overture providing solo and duet opportunities from all sections of the orchestra.

Next came, what for many must have been a highlight – Bach's Suite No 2 in B Minor for flute and strings.

Following the French Overtures is a series of seven dances and here talented soloist Lucy Sale excelled as her “magical” flute complemented and contrasted with the strings. Miss Sale, who is also a pianist, percussionist and a singer, clearly has a promising career ahead of her.

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The orchestra's final piece was Grieg's famous Peer Gynt Suite No 1 with its recognisable four movements, the third movement performed by nine solo strings and triangle.

Richard Hall took up the baton for the concert band's performance with Ruth Hiles as leader. The programme opened with the Peter Loo Overture by Malcolm Arnold, the Norfolk-based composer who is president of WNJYO.

This striking piece, its lyrical opening contrasting with its dynamic central section, saw the musicians working hard to create swirls of almost majestic sound rising to a dramatic crescendo.

The audience were then treated to a contrasting series of pieces including Gershwin's famous An American In Paris, Percy Grainger's Lincolnshire Posy, Scott Joplin's Maple Leaf Rag and finally James Curnow's Toward The Rising Sun with its majestic opening fanfare.

The appreciative audience would not let the youngsters leave the stage before an encore. Evenings such as this, performed by such dedicated and enthusiastic young musicians, show that the future of orchestral and concert performance is in capable hands.

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