Tasmin Little and Martin Roscoe

MICHAEL DRAKE There is always something new in the festival, and last night saw the introduction of a mouse – an electronic version under the foot of Tasmin Little to turn the pages of computerised scores.

MICHAEL DRAKE

There is always something new in the festival, and last night saw the introduction of a mouse – an electronic version under the foot of Tasmin Little to turn the pages of computerised scores. And all worked well in Prokofiev's transcribed Sonata No 2 in D major (to be played next week incidentally by Philippa Davies in its original version for flute) – continuously free-flowing, skipping and highly rhythmic in the scherzo where the artists made it such fun, sensitive in the romanze and joyful in the strength of the finale – Ms Little was really talking.

It was rather better balanced than the preceding B flat major Sonata of Mozart, where the full-sized grand was rather overbearing. Despite this and the relative seriousness of the music, the delightful and glamorous Ms Little brought her renowned warm tone to it, particularly in a captivating central section.

Szymanowski's Narcisse, with its impressionist influence, allowed the magic to be brought out and one could almost see the reflection in the waves of notes from both violin and piano. A total change of scene was Brahms' great Sonata No 3 in D minor, generally not soothing, but the central theme of the opening movement was an oasis in the sombre and passionate surroundings with which the work is imbued.

t Tasmin Little and Martin Roscoe performed at the John Innes Centre,Colney, Norwich.

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