Sugarbabes rule in Thetford Forest

Richard BatsonSugababesThetford ForestHere come the girls! Singing and strutting in the middle of a forest of trees and waving arms.As soon as the trio appeared in slinky black numbers and set the scene with two early chart toppers - Freak Like Me and Round Round - the tone for the woodland venue's summer concert season finale was set and there was no going back.Richard Batson

Sugababes

Thetford Forest

Here come the girls! Singing and strutting in the middle of a forest of trees and waving arms.

As soon as the trio appeared in slinky black numbers and set the scene with two early chart toppers - Freak Like Me and Round Round - the tone for the woodland venue's summer concert season finale was set and there was no going back.

The audience was dominated by girls - some at primary school and wearing glowing necklaces and souvenir t-shirts, some many years older but who had grown up to the soundtrack of the catchy songs created by the Babes who were also teenagers at the time.

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Dads provided the shoulders to sit on, and the designated drivers, but were also enjoying the sounds - and sights - of the sassy singers.

The Sugas burst on the chart scene around the millennium, two years after they were formed, and have followed up with a string of hit singles and albums. They were the youngest girl band ever to top the charts.

There have of course been changes since then - with only the soulful Keisha Buchanan remaining, and now partnered by former Atomic Kitten Heidi Range and Amelle Berrabah.

But the musical glue that holds them together is strong stuff - with some sumptuous harmonies, particularly in their version of En Vogue's Don't Let Go.

There were some quieter moments such an acoustic version of Stronger, but the Sugas are sweetest when they are belting out their bounciest hits.

During the encore session of Push the Button, Girls and About You Now the whole forest seemed to be singing along - and if the squirrels had also been wearing glow-stick necklaces I am sure we would have seen them dancing in the trees too.

Richard Batson