Six of the Best: Cultural highlights not to miss this weekend

Bowjangles: On The Box. Picture: Mike Massaro

Bowjangles: On The Box. Picture: Mike Massaro - Credit: Archant

Simon Parkin picks six cultural highlights not to miss in the region this weekend.

SHOW

Bowjangles: On The Box

Sheringham Little Theatre, February 14, 7.30pm, £12, 01263 822347, www.sheringhamlittletheatre.com

Accomplished string quartet, Bowjangles, return in a comprehensive TV listing like none you'll have ever experienced. Bowjangles on the Box follows a schedule for the BJBC (Bowjangles BroadcastingCorporation), including morning TV, news, weather and soap opera, with the group performing all the necessary roles, whilst of course playing their instruments to a jaw droppingly high level, in a clever, unique, all singing, all dancing take on the cultural phenomenon that is TV. If you like music, song, dance and comedy, you will love this multi-talented four-piece who not only play their instruments superbly – they also sing, dance, leap, tumble and even juggle.

CONCERT

The French Influence

Cathedral of St John The Baptist, Norwich, February 14, 7.45pm, £17-£4, 01603 628319, ticketsource.co.uk/keswickhallchoir

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Keswick Hall Choir — now in its 43rd season — is widely regarded as Norfolk's leading amateur chamber choir. In previous concerts they have explored some 19th century and early 20th century French music. For this latest performance they include some more luscious textures of mid-later 20th and early 21st century music. The Messe pour Notre Dame by David Briggs displays all the power and grandeur of a typical French organ mass, but written by an Englishman. The four motets by Duruflé are classics of their style. Two sets of three chansons, by Debussy and Jean Françaix, contrast early and late 20th century styles.

THEATRE

Inside

The Garage, Chapel Field North, Norwich, February 13, 8pm, £10, £5 under-25s/students, 01603 630000, www.thegarage.org.uk

Inspired by a series of tragic true stories, this psychological drama that explores the effects of Stockholm Syndrome on a kidnap victim desperate to keep hope has won huge acclaim for its insights into the subject.

Performed by writer and actress Rosie MacPherson, who spent 18 months writing the play, it is inspired by the stories of kidnap victims Natascha Kampusch, Elisabeth Fritzl and Jaycee Lee Dugard and research by hostage psychology experts. Over the course of a tense hour, the heroine, who was abducted aged 12 on her way home from school, and has been in captivity for 12 years, discovers the door to her prison is open. Will she be able to escape?

MUSIC

She'Koyokh Band

Churchgate Meeting House, Bury St Edmunds, February 15, 3pm, £15 (£5 students), 01284 769505, www.theatreroyal.org

Hailed by Songlines as Britain's best Klezmer and Balkan music band, She'Koyokh's evolution spans the humble origins of busking at East London's Columbia Road flower market to performing in the famous concert halls of Europe including Amsterdam's Concert Gebouw and London's Southbank Centre. The multi-lingual eight-piece British band whose members include a classically trained violinist and clarinettist, a Serbian accordionist, an American mandolin player, a Greek percussionist and a remarkable young singer who is a Turkish Kurd.

COMEDY

Paul Foot

Norwich Playhouse, February 14, 8pm, £12.50, 01603 598598, www.norwichplayhouse.co.uk

The mulleted king of surreal comedy returns again his latest show Hovercraft Symphony in Gammon # Major, which was previously completely sold out at Norwich Playhouse in October. His subversive, insightful absurdity constantly challenges and delights his faithful connoisseurs. His most recent TV credits include BBC1's Would I Lie To You, BBC2's Never Mind The Buzzcocks, C4's 8 Out Of 10 Cats and Comedy Central's The Alternative Comedy Experience.

MUSIC

Mariachi El Bronx

Epic Studios, Magdalen Street, Norwich, February 15, 7.30pm, £12 (£10 NUS), 01603 727727, www.epicstudiosnorwich.com

LA punk punk outfit The Bronx's Mexicana side project is revived this time with them fusing synthesizers and electronics into their traditional mariachi sound. Originally conceived in 2006, the idea came about when The Bronx were asked to play an acoustic set and, rather than simply pare down their sound, they took their music in a whole new direction, moving away from hardcore and exploring Latin sounds. They have returned to the project occasionally ever since exploring different aspects of the mariachi sound.

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